AP US History ("APUSH") Assignments

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Book reports for those NOT taking AP Test: TEST LEVEL GRADE ON ASSIGNMENT in Google Classroom

Book reports for those NOT taking AP Test: TEST LEVEL GRADE ON ASSIGNMENT

THE DUE DATE IS A HARD DATE. NO EXTENSIONS. THERE ARE NO EXTENSIONS FOR THE AP TEST, SO NONE HERE.


Ty Arnot--The Worst Hard Time by Tim Egan
John Alexander Field--The Other America by Michael Harrington
Carolina Ockerman--Inventing A Nation by Gore Vidal
Jeffrey Ockerman--The Quiet American by Graham Greene

Attached is the rubric. And if it seems familiar, it is from Ms. Walker, English teacher extraordinaire.  This is to be a five page essay, double spaced, with 12 font Arial or New Times Roman. Use Google Docs or Word and upload when completed before or at the deadline on the due date.

Due:

Martin Luther King, Jr.'s assassination, RFK's responses, and RFK's assassination in Google Classroom

Martin Luther King, Jr.'s assassination, RFK's responses, and RFK's assassination

We will watch parts of these videos in order in class on Monday, May 2.

Due:

Helpful video for AP US History MCQs from Heimler in Google Classroom

Helpful video for AP US History MCQs from Heimler

Due:

AP TEST MCQS from Princeton Review Practice Test for Baseline in Google Classroom

AP TEST MCQS from Princeton Review Practice Test for Baseline

REMEMBER to bring your PRINCETON REVIEW to school today.

Due:

Unit 9 in Google Classroom

Unit 9

There are eight videos for the entirety of Unit 9. I have uploaded them. We will watch in April 12 and 13 (Tues and Wed) classes.

And listen for a couple of minutes to Ronald Reagan, right after he won the 1980 Republican Party's presidential nomination, say, in Philadelphia, Mississippi, where the three civil rights Freedom Riders (Goodman, Cheney, and Schwerner) were murdered, how he believes in "states' rights."  The usual Reaganite line that somehow, the government helping people is a racket is on full display, too.  

For the AMSCO notes, pace yourselves and do 9.1 and 9.2 by tomorrow night, and for the remaining ones, do two on Friday, and three on Saturday (as 9.7 is short; see below).  Then, you will be done and have time to do SAT studying all weekend long, and fully on Sunday.  And don't avoid reading my takes on the chapters' phrasings, what they leave out, and what they elide along the way. 


AMSCO Notes for Unit 9:

10 Points: 9.1. This can be a one paragraph summary, and note the timeline information.
25 Points: 9.2. This is a long chapter that goes beyond Key Terms. Make sure all Key Terms are defined/explained as well as capturing the chart at page 700, and, from the start, the details of the 1980 election (a non-supply side, moderate Republican, which would be at least Joe Biden or to his economic left today, candidate, John Anderson had over 7% of the vote), note that supply side economics is a hoax that has never worked--because people learn quickly that they can't cut what they did not understand before was actually important, and we love to throw money at the military--, and how the nation began to change toward what it remains now.  Reagan was transformative, but in a highly disruptive, often negative, manner.
20 Points: 9.3. This chapter is awful in how it describes the US war crimes in training, funding, and protecting right wing dictators who were anything but "friendly" to their own populations. We facilitated, condoned, and ultimately supported the murder of priests and nuns, teachers, doctors, nurses, labor union organizers and leaders, and other important people in a civil society.  I just wish we had time to see the evidence for this, as it is simply irrefutable.  As I argued in the 1980s, if you gave me the choice of being a dissident or political opponent of the Nicaraguan Sandinista government or the governments our nation was actively promoting and supporting, I'd take the Sandinistas any day. Any comparison of human rights organization reports would have told anyone objectively looking at the degrees of repression would tell anyone not super rich that conclusion. The paragraph on Israel is worse (see page 706). Israel claimed it was stopping border raids, but the PLO had abided by an informal peace agreement for over a year, with very few skirmishes from both sides, and it was the Israeli government using an excuse of an Arafat enemy and PLO offshoot's shooting of the Israeli ambassador to Great Britain in London that set off that war. The Israeli premier, Menachem Begin, resigned in self-stated disgrace once he realized how his leading general, General Arik Sharon, had misled him, and that war saw the creation of the Hezbollah, the Lebanese based Islamic fundamentalist terrorist organization. The secular oriented PLO were nothing in terms of danger to Israel compared to Hezbollah.  Great job, hawks. Great job.
15 Points: 9.4. This chapter is short and makes it sound like the NAFTA and WTO are just inevitable. They may be so, but it is a bad inevitability that, if CRITICALLY understood, would explain the inequality that further developed (the NAFTA/WTO codified into law the trends already begun in the 1970s in terms of global corporate power), and migration/immigration patterns described in 9.5. 
15 Points: 9.5. Pay careful attention in this chapter as it is trying to tell us why I am correct, but is afraid to openly do so.
25 Points: 9.6 Another long chapter, as with 9.2.  This summarizes the Obama and Trump years. They do so in a very safe and corporate-drenched normalized way, but that is the way it is in terms of how we inculcate our youth to conform to the mythology that envelops our politics. :(
5 Points: Summarize in two paragraphs the points made in 9.7.

Due:

8.12 and 8.14 Assignments in Google Classroom

8.12 and 8.14 Assignments

YOU MUST GET CAUGHT UP THIS WEEKEND.  WE MUST FINISH UNIT 9 BY TUESDAY, APRIL 19.  I WILL GIVE YOU TILL MONDAY NIGHT TO COMPLETE UNIT 8, AND TIME IN CLASS ON MONDAY. I WON'T DO THE DBQ FOR UNIT 8 I WAS GOING TO DO FOR UNIT 8 AS WE WILL WORK ON DBQs/LEQs WHILE STUDYING IN CLASS AND BEYOND WITH THE PRINCETON REVIEW. 

I AM STARTING UNIT 9 ON TUESDAY, APRIL 12. HOWEVER, FIRST, WE WILL GO THROUGH THE TWO SETS OF MCQs IN AP CENTRAL FOR 8.12 AND 8.14 TO ENSURE WE ARE UNDERSTANDING OUR 1960s AND 1970s TIMELINE. THEN, WE WILL WATCH IN CLASS THE TWO VIDEOS OPENING AP CENTRAL 9.1 AND 9.2. THERE ARE FOR ONE EACH CHAPTER. WE WILL WATCH UNIT 9 VIDEOS IN CLASS THROUGHOUT THIS WEEK. 

ON MONDAY, APRIL 11, I WILL GIVE MORE CONTEXT THAN EITHER THE AMSCO BOOK OR AP CENTRAL GIVE TO THE BLACK PANTHERS, AS I REALIZED THE VIDEO I SHOWED YOU WAS TOO PRO-BLACK PANTHERS, IN NOT GIVING ENOUGH ABOUT THE VIOLENCE THE PANTHERS PERPETRATED--WHILE AT THE SAME TIME DID NOT GIVE US ENOUGH ABOUT THE FBI AND POLICE REACTIONS, INCLUDING AN ORGANIZED POLICE/FBI MURDER OF A BLACK PANTHER, FRED HAMPTON, IN CHICAGO IN 1969, AND THE FBI's EXTENSIVE COINTELPRO (Counterintelligence Program) THAT WENT AFTER THE BLACK PANTHERS, STUDENTS AGAINST THE VIETNAM WAR, AND ANTI NUCLEAR ACTIVISTS. ALSO, I WANT TO SHOW YOU AN ARTICLE FROM THE ATLANTIC ABOUT HOW CALIFORNIA REALLY GOT ITS "LIBERAL" GUN CONTROL LAWS. :)

8.12 Assignment
15 Points: Cornell Notes or define/explain Key Terms in AMSCO 8.12
3 Points: AMSCO 8.12 MCQs
2 Points: SAQs 1a ONLY 
2 Points: Watch AP Central video
4 Points: two paragraph summary of AP Central video

8.14 Assignment

25 Points: Cornell Notes or define/explain Key Terms in AMSCO 8.14
3 Points: AMSCO 8.14 MCQs
2 Points: SAQs 1a ONLY
2 Points: Watch AP Central video
4 Points: two paragraph summary of AP Central video

SUPPLEMENTAL VIEWING/READING
15 Points: Brief history of the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense. Write two paragraphs or eight bullet points after viewing that summarizes the video.
5 Points: Kathleen Cleaver of the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense on her hairstyle, and what that styles speaks to in 1968. Write one paragraph or four bullet points summarizing this one minute video. 
10 Points: Read the introduction and the various sections (you don't have to listen to the interview), and write two paragraphs summarizing the NPR interview with Seth Rosenfeld for his book, "Subversives," which is about the Hoover led, and Reagan assisted, attack on Mario Savio, and the man Savio thought he was primarily fight, UC Chancellor, Clark Kerr. Both were victims, and the tragedy is Kerr's refusal to go public with the attacks on him from the FBI and the Regents (Board of Directors) of the UC system.

WHAT WE WATCHED ON THURSDAY APRIL 7, 2022 IN CLASS:
IN CLASS: Short version where we see Mario live, and we see fellow activist Michael Roseman speak about students who were expelled for opposing the prohibition of political speech.
IN CLASS: "Mario Savio: An End to History" is the name of the video on YouTube. Why that is called that I don't understand. But, anyway, we will watch the under eight minute speech from Mario Savio, leader of the Berkeley campus, Free Speech Movement (FSM) in December 1964, where students, from left to conservative, united for a brief moment to end a new rule put in by the University of CA administration to prohibit students from passing out leaflets for political matters, starting with civil rights. As discussed, the Student Movement initially grew out of the Freedom Riders and then expanded by 1965 and 1966 into agitation against the growing US War Against Vietnam.  By 1966, over half a million troops had been drafted into the military to fight against Vietnamese peasants, and young Americans grew increasingly angry at what appeared to be a war of attrition for a cause not really making much sense at the time, or any time, frankly, unless it is about maintaining an Empire. Savio's speech is without notes or formal preparation. Listen to his passion, his articulation, and his recognition of how institutional organizations function. 
IN CLASS: Footage from 1964 which includes Savio explaining the function of universities.
IN CLASS: Interview with a Vietnam Veteran who explains what the US government and media were saying, and what he found when he got to Vietnam. I had a communication with this fellow years ago because I mentioned him in my novel about RFK as an aside, and he said I had captured exactly what he felt. I never saw this footage until the last few years, which does show my gut about him was correct.
IN CLASS: From 1970. Hard hats in favor of the war and against the "radicals"--notice how the pro-war speakers fetishize the flag. 
IN CLASS: Ramparts magazine cover from 1967 (draft cards burning)
IN CLASS: The Atlantic, "The Secret History of Guns" (Sept 2011 issue)
IN CLASS: Video of latest documents released regarding the FBI's role with the Chicago police in murdering Fred Hampton in 1969, after Hampton, who was not as violent as Huey Newton or Eldridge Cleaver had become, was pushing for medical clinics, food banks, and education programs for Chicago black youth and their families. Hampton had also made contact with white supremacist groups, and had initially convinced them to unite as workers and poor, and go beyond race. 
IN CLASS: the Black Panthers' murder of its white bookkeeper, Betty Van Patter in 1974 (Wikipedia)

Due:

8.11 and 8.13 Assignments in Google Classroom

8.11 and 8.13 Assignments

8.11 Assignment:
15 Points: Cornell Notes or define/explain Key Terms for AMSCO 8.11.  Pretty straight forward, I have to admit.
2 Points: AMSCO MCQs 8.11 (note the organization name in the passage is the National Organization FOR Women, not "OF")
NO SAQs
4 Points: Watch AP Central videos (two)
8 Points: Write one paragraph summaries for EACH of the two videos
3 Points: AP Central MCQs (The Civil Rights Movement Expands)

8.13 Assignment:
15 Points: Cornell Notes or define/explain Key Terms for AMSCO 8.13. Pretty straight forward, again, I have to admit.
2 Points: AMSCO MCQs
2 Points: SAQ 1a ONLY (NOT 1b and NOT 1c)
2 Points: Watch AP Central video (one)
4 Points: Write one paragraph summaries for the video
NO AP CENTRAL MCQs for 8.13

Due:

8.9 The Great Society Programs from LBJ in Google Classroom

8.9 The Great Society Programs from LBJ

15 Points: AMSCO 8.9 Cornell Notes and make sure you are careful in writing the notes. Two things you have to do in these notes above the usual: (1) write down the main programs at page 647 and know what they did, and (2) write carefully the notes for the immigration section, and include an explanation of the numbers of where immigrants are coming from at the SAQS (I AM NOT ASSIGNING THE SAQs FOR 8.9) at page 650. When you read the supplemental readings below, and watch the John Oliver video, taking good notes will make more of an impact on your overall comprehension.  SOMETHING THE BOOK WON'T ADMIT: It never occurs to the AP and AMSCO folks that our military training and economic interventions in the 1970s and 1980s in Central and South America played a role in the flood of refugees, or how our trade policies of beggaring peasants through our subsidies for American corporate agriculture disrupted those regions of Central and South America.  Oh well. America!
4 Points: AMSCO 8.9 MCQs (be careful of phrasing of prompts to not get fooled)
4 Points: Watch AP Central videos
8 Points: Write one paragraph for EACH of the two AP Central videos
3 Points: AP Central MCQs (Great Society)
20 Points: Four paragraphs or twelve bullet points for Substack article on why the Great Society was a success. SIMPLE POINT I MAKE FOR YEARS: The Great Society was not the New Deal, though it is often seen as an extension, which in part it was. However, the Great Society did not rely on providing direct jobs to anywhere near the extent of the New Deal, and was more of a holding pattern of money or food stamps with the assumption the private sector would provide the jobs. Hence, a focus on job training, but not getting jobs, too. LBJ and the Congress did not understand how industrial jobs had left the city for the suburbs--often as part of racist housing patterns that were persisting in the 1960s--and blacks, Hispanics, and immigrants were getting Head Start, Medicaid, and other programs, but the jobs were not there even with training. The right wing critique of the Great Society is "You can't throw money at problems--well, for war, we always can!" The left wing critique has been "You did not throw enough money at the problem, and didn't create jobs the way at least FDR did--and damn you, we wanted socialism in a society that had demonized the word, wah!" Still, I happen to think the left critique is more valid, even though this article shows how badly off people would be without the programs. The most radical argument says, though: "You know, if these people didn't get food stamps, Medicaid, housing subsidies, etc., there'd be a revolution and blood would flow in the suburbs." Hmmmm.....Oh boy. :(
15 Points: AMSCO MCQ says the Great Society "most closely related" to the New Deal. It was compared to the other choices in the question. However, this article from Time Magazine explains the difference so you, sitting in 2022, do not see the two in one big blur of sameness.  Write four paragraphs or twelve bullet points summarizing this article.
10 Points: Watch John Oliver explain immigration laws for the past 60 years, starting with the 1965 immigration reforms, and demolish most "mainstream" arguments we hear in our largely white folks or professional managerial class suburbs regarding "legal" immigration. To avoid the funny stuff, and some tough language references (though there are plenty of those later), start at 2:00 minutes in. Then, write two paragraphs or eight bullet points summarizing the video.  Oh, and remember two things: (1) Remember how I explained how easy it was for my family on both sides to get into the US; and (2) the birth rate in the US has dropped dramatically and we are rapidly aging, so that if we tried true redevelopment of our infrastructure, we don't have enough workers to even train.  We would find very quickly we will need "Help Wanted" signs at ports and borders. Oh well. Keep worrying about "illegal" immigration.

Due:

8.8 Assignments: Vietnam (the US War Against Vietnam) in Google Classroom

8.8 Assignments: Vietnam (the US War Against Vietnam)

25 Points: AMSCO 8.8: Cornell Notes and explain/define Key Terms. You want to read this carefully because I want you to consider the email I wrote to the AP Central video teacher about her three AP Central videos, and indirectly, how I am responding at the same time to the AMSCO folks.
3 Points: AMSCO 8.8 MCQs
6 Points: AMSCO 8.8 SAQs
6 Points: AMSCO AP Central Videos (three)
3 Points: AP Central MCQs (Vietnam)
12 Points: One paragraph for EACH of the three videos (you really should watch these carefully, though, as you will see why was so frustrated with the way in which the high school teacher, who has a PhD in Education, and a Master's in History, was so wrong or misleading)
10 Points: AND NOW FOR A SHOCK FOR MOST OF THE CLASS: Summarize my email to Dr. Webb re: the AP Central videos, specifically noting the information I am providing.  Needless to say, I don't expect a response from Dr. Webb, and it remains disgusting to me how the AP Central folks can allow such misleading information about our nation's war against Vietnam sixty and seventy years after the fact.  Simply put, every American president from Truman to Nixon set forth a major lie to the American people in order to increase our involvement. It was far less important who was a Democrat or Republican. The system took us each step of the way, and our leaders engaged in lies to the American people nearly each step of the way, and along the way, we were responsible as a nation for two to three million deaths in Vietnam, and played a role in destabilizing Cambodian society that led to the Communist Khmer Rouge taking over in 1975, where at least 700,000 Cambodians were systemically murdered (some say the number reached 2 million, but that has been criticized in this century).
20 Points: Listen to Phil Ochs' 1964 publicly released song, "Talkin' Vietnam," released when he was 24 in 1964, and then listen to "White Boots Marching in a Yellow Land" from Ochs in 1968.  THEN, write two full paragraphs of four sentences each about the similarities and differences, if any, in substance of the points made, and the tone in which the songs are sung, and include from each song the type of information and perspective he was providing listeners in 1964.  Ochs was merely a young folksinger, with no inside information from the top levels of government. Ochs, however, at that time, read widely and carefully out of a hope that Americans would see through what he saw as government mendacity and how corporate power operated in tandem with the government in the area of wars and foreign policy. The fact Ochs, as a young folksinger, may have had a fairly deep grasp on what was going on with respect to our nation's deepening involvement in southeast Asia may be seen as a sad commentary about how power is exercised in the United States, and how people in government and business get ahead. It is not as if either of these songs were played on the radio, for example, though props are definitely merited to Elektra Records, which included these songs on Ochs' albums from 1964 and 1968, respectively.

Due:

8.6 and 8.10 The 1940s/1950s Civil Rights Movement and the 1960s Civil Rights Movement in Google Classroom

8.6 and 8.10 The 1940s/1950s Civil Rights Movement and the 1960s Civil Rights Movement

8.6 Assignments

15 Points: AMSCO 8.6: explain and define the Key Terms if you do not want to do Cornell Notes
3 Points: AMSCO 8.6 MCQs
NO SAQs
2 Points: Watch the AP Central video
4 Points: Write one paragraph (four sentences) for the one AP Central video
3 Points: AP Central MCQs (Early Steps Civil Rights Movement)

8.10 Assignments

15 Points: AMSCO 8.10: explain and define the Key Terms if you do not want to do Cornell Notes
3 Points: AMSCO 8.10 MCQs
6 Points: AMSCO 8.10 SAQs
4 Points: Watch two AP Central videos
8 Points: Write one paragraph (four sentences) summary for EACH of the two AP Central videos
3 Points: AP Central MCQs (The African-American Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s)

We will be watching in class on Tuesday, March 29 and Wednesday, March 30, 2022, a documentary on the Freedom Riders movement of the early 1960s called "Freedom in the Mind."  It consists of then live footage rarely seen before the film was released in or about 1994, and interviews with people who, after returning back to college from the Freedom Rides, became major student protestors in the 1960s, more against the Vietnam War or for farmworker rights in the southwest and California. What the film shows is how the Freedom Rides galvanized young people at often elite colleges across the nation to hold our nation accountable with respect to our nation's ideals.  We will also watch a short video of Robert Reich, President Bill Clinton's former Secretary of Labor, speak about a Freedom Rider who inspired him, and hear an early (and I mean early!) Simon & Garfunkel song about a Freedom Rider who S&G personally knew.    

Due:

8.7 Assignments in Google Classroom

8.7 Assignments

As I said this past week, we are skipping 8.6 as I want to put the civil rights movement chapters together.  This chapter 8.7 is about America as a World Power, and a particularly bloody, hypocritical, and war criminal type of power.  And we haven't even reached the US War Against Vietnam chapter yet, something we will hit next week.

20 Points: AMSCO 8.7 Cornell Notes. Make sure you don't miss the non-bolded sections, particularly regarding how Ghana overthrew British rule in 1957, and how the US policy was often designed to ensure colonialism would continue under US auspices, and how the US ironically helped Nasser--who it generally despised--only to ensure British and French (and at the time Israeli) colonialism should not be undertaken.  This should help us understand why some on the left see hypocrisy in the war crime accusations against Putin--though the difference between the American left and American right is the American left sees what Putin did as a war crime, too. The American right, however, is so used to supporting white nationalism, it is now confused over Russia's invasion of Ukraine. Heh.
3 Points: AMSCO 8.7 MCQs (Yes, this is funny from Henry Kissinger, who would have overthrown the early US government and murdered Alexander Hamilton for daring to challenge British hegemony after the US revolutionaries took over Tory lands, and set up tariffs to build up its own industry.  It is where mercantilism meets Marxism, and the US is against both to the extent the mercantilists are not sufficiently pro-modern US based corporations).
6 Points: AMSCO SAQs (1a, 1b, and 1c only)
2 Points: watch and wince AP Central 8.7 video
4 Points: write a two paragraph summary of AP Central 8.7 video
3 Points: AP Central MCQs (America as a World Power)  This is a great example of where rhetoric contradicts record. Eisenhower did the interventions/coups in Guatemala, Iran, and intervened in the British/French/Israeli take over of the Suez Canal.  Eisenhower (Known as "Ike" Eisenhower) also put troops into Lebanon in 1958 to quell "unrest" among the populace there, in order to preserve Western-French elites' power there. Beirut was called the Paris of the Middle East....:). And finally, Eisenhower supported overthrowing Castro in Cuba and it was under his administration that the plans for the Bay of Pigs invasion in Cuba were made. So, again, don't buy into rhetoric, but answer those MCQs as if that rhetoric was the policy.  The AP folks can be so shallow, right? 

Supplemental reading:

15 Points: Four paragraphs or twelve bullet points re: Zinn Education project's discussion of the CIA/US backed Guatemala coup in 1954
15 Points: Four paragraphs or twelve bullet points re: Washington Post article on how the US enabled, trained, or sometimes participated in the murder of Guatemalans over decades. As famed and often seen as controversial commentator, Noam Chomsky, says, It is in the continuities of US foreign policy that we see the most war criminal behaviors.
10 Points: Read the first five paragraphs of the website of the NSARCHIVE.org (National Security Archives at George Washington U in Washington, DC) regarding then newly declassified documentation regarding US involvement and support for the right wing military coup in Indonesia and then killing hundreds of thousands of Indonesians in the 1965-1966 period.  Then, write a paragraph or four bullet points regarding the summary of the paragraphs read.
10 Points: one paragraph of US involvement in supporting Brazilian military coup in 1964, and overthrowing elected government (National Security Archives again). Just first five paragraphs.
10 Points: one paragraph summary of US invention of sending US marines into Dominican Republic, supposedly to stop communism, but we knew we were stopping an independent minded government trying to end colonialism. History.com. Note how it admits the US offered phony evidence to support its position the nation was going "communist" and somehow was a threat to the US or our people.
5 Points: Listen to Phil Ochs' "Cops of the World" (1966) and write a paragraph about whether you agree with Phil Ochs, a then 26 year old folksinger, and whether you think this was a big hit on the US commercial radio stations. 
5 Points: Listen to Phil Ochs' Santo Domingo" and analyze, English course style, in one paragraph how Ochs constructed the song's verses to mesh in with the chorus about the Marines having landed on the shores of Santo Domingo, which is what the Dominican Republic was once called.  In short, how does Ochs describe our marines and troops, and is he saying we are doing well there?  References for the opening patter from Ochs to the audience: Soupy Sales was a children's show host in the 1960s--but sometimes subversive, I must say, and Walter Lippmann was, by then, a big time political commentator who was a major conventional wisdom exponent on behalf of the US Empire. I added a Soupy clip to provide an idea of how he subverted white American youth like me. :)  Soupy Sales was most famous for the whipped cream pie to the face, which for some reason on YouTube there are only later clips in the 1970s or beyond of Soupy getting hit with the pie.

Due:

8.5 Assignments: Culture After 1945 in Google Classroom

8.5 Assignments: Culture After 1945

20 Points: AMSCO 8.5: Cornell Notes but make sure you have every single one of the Key Terms summarized, explained, or defined.
10 Points: Write a paragraph summary for EACH of the four paragraphs of Historical Perspectives at AMSCO page 617, so that you have four paragraphs altogether
NO AMSCO MCQs
6 Points: AMSCO 8.5 SAQs, 1a, 1b, and 1c (note the main difference is whether consumer culture, as with white women flappers in the 1920s smoking cigarettes, are over the extent to which the Baby Boomers and their parents were consciously driving the culture, or manipulated by the advertisers and corporate executives)
2 Points: Watch 8.5 AP Central video
4 Points: Write two paragraph summary of 8.5 AP Central video
3 Points: AP Central MCQs (Culture after 1945 quiz)
10 Points: Write two paragraphs or five bullet points that summarizes the points Louis Menand makes about whether Baby Boomers created or led the culture they existed in or whether they were led by older people. Note how he says the biggest year of the Baby Boom is 1957.  Ahem. That is the year I was born.  And he is right that I was just a bit too young for Woodstock in 1969, and did not start attending rock concerts until 1972. :)  However, don't oversimplify Menand's point, when he acknowledges millions of people influenced by these slightly older people did have an impact on the culture.
20 Points: Four paragraphs or twelve bullet points regarding the review of Barbara Ehrenreich's "The Hearts of Men," which posits feminism was less about women deciding to be selfish in their feminism as much as it was women seeking to counteract the fact too many men had already been acting selfishly and taking flight from their responsibilities and commitments to their wives and children. 
25 Points: Five paragraphs or twenty bullet points regarding Paul Goodman's review of Jack Kerouac's "On the Road" (1957)

Due:

8.4  Assignments: Economy After 1945 in Google Classroom

8.4 Assignments: Economy After 1945

20 Points: Key Terms but also include inside the paragraph information or Cornell Notes for AMSCO 8.4
3 Points: AMSCO 8.4 MCQs
4 Points: Watch 8.4 AP Central Videos
8 Points: Summarize in two paragraphs EACH of the two Videos for 8.4
15 Points: Twelve bullet points or four paragraphs on History.com article on GI Bill and how Black soldiers were systemically kept from taking advantage of the bill
15 Points: Twelve bullet points or four paragraphs from History.com regarding redlining, or how black Americans were kept from integrating with white people throughout the United States for decades and decades.
10 Points: Watch video about Levittown from the 1950s, and write twelve bullet points or four paragraphs explaining the arguments against integration of African_Americans and white people in the suburbs, where you think your own grandparents stood on that issue, and where you think you would stand if you were brought up in that era.  


Supplemental Reading: EVERYONE EXCEPT Alex Field and Aidan Jennings-Quattropani have to read and write, for each of the two articles, four paragraphs or twelve bullet points for these two articles which explain the "stagflation" of the 1970s:


15 Points: Four paragraphs or twelve bullet points on the Nixon wheat deal for Russia and the effect of wheat being given to the Soviet Union on inflation and meat prices
25 Points: Seven paragraphs and 17 bullet points on Robert Sherrill's history of oil company collaborating with the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), and the oil shocks of the 1970s. Does this sound familiar to us in any way, as we consider: (1) Russia only supplies 3% of crude oil to the US; (2) The top four oil companies made over $75 BILLION in profits last year; and (3) Joe Biden, after his initial short pause in oil rights leasing, ended up issuing MORE oil leases to oil companies, large and small, in Biden's first year than Trump did in Trump's first year.

Due:

8.3 Assignment: The Red Scare in Google Classroom

8.3 Assignment: The Red Scare

20 Points: This is a short chapter, relative to 8.2. I want Cornell Notes because the Key Terms are not enough to truly understand. I will be speaking more in our first class after we return about why it is the Red Scare--Senator Joe McCarthy (R-WI) does not show up until the summer of 1950, so it is wrong to simply call it "McCarthyism" or the "McCarthy Era"--was a structure put into place through corporate powerbases in the business world, media, and politics to ultimately ensure the New Deal never happens again.  The ultimate purpose was therefore to attack New Deal liberals.  Here is conservative icon William F. Buckley, with is even more right wing and often vulgar brother in law, Brent Bozell, writing in their pro-McCarthy book, "McCarthy and His Enemies" (1954) at page 333, where they were defending McCarthy conflating the Democratic Party's presidential nominee, Adlai Stevenson, in 1952 with the convicted Communist, Alger Hiss, and how McCarthy and other right wingers would inveigh against the New Deal-- calling it "Twenty Years of Treason." Here are Buckley and Bozell in 1954:

"...But it may well be we have not heard the last of this idea (of conflating a mainstream Democratic Party politician such as Stevenson with Alger Hiss).  Some day, the patience of America may at last be exhausted, and we will strike out against Liberals. (footnote omitted) Not because they are treacherous...but because...we will conclude 'that they are mistaken in their predictions, false in their analyses, wrong in their advice, and through the results of their actions injurious to the interests of the nation.  That is a reason enough to strive to free the conduct of the country's affairs from the influence of them and their works.'"

NOTE: The footnote I omitted simply said, in effect, oh don't worry, Liberals. We won't physically attack or kill you. Just politics, ya know?

What I am going to talk about in my post-Spring Break opening lecture, which may take two classes, is to first explain why the Smyth Report of 1946 and the Franck Report from atomic scientists in 1945 already provided the basic information regarding the building of atomic weaponry to the general public, and therefore to Soviet scientists. The Franck Report was a then secret report in 1945 from atomic scientists at Los Alamos and Chicago (the two main places where the first bombs were built) explaining the Soviet scientists in 1940 already had the know-how, and once they saw atomic bombs could be built and used, to just reverse engineer their way to the bombs "in a few years."  At the time, the US scientists did not know about the Rosenbergs, or Klaus Fuchs (a German Communist scientist the British government insisted be brought to Los Alamos over Oppenheimer's opposition, irony!), or anyone else. The Rosenbergs remain the ONLY people executed for espionage in the history of our Republic.  

I will also show why it is wrong to even attack people such as Harry Dexter White, the father of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and World Bank, or even Alger Hiss as spies for the Soviet Union, and the irony that one can make a better case that Trump is an agent of influence, dupe, or useful idiot for Putin, than White or Hiss being such with respect to Stalin. Yes, irony, again.  

The conflation of believing National Health Insurance is socialist, therefore communist, therefore treason is the precise result of the Red Scare of the late 1940s and 1950s.  Yes, there were some people in government, unions, and universities who were members of the Communist Party.  But that did not make those people traitors, and, in the context of Allen and John Foster Dulles playing the same games of footsie and dealings with Nazis and Fascists, why were the Dulles Brothers rewarded with high government positions in the then newly created CIA or Secretary of State?  It is as if we demonized one side but exulted and feted the other.

Don't worry if that is too complicated, as I will discuss this so we understand the context.

2 Points: AMSCO MCQs 
2 Points: 8.3 AP Central Video (yes, it is awful, but note the last few minutes for its practicum)
4 Points: summarize in three paragraphs the 8.3 AP Central Video, focusing on the charts and then the way he talks about HOW to write about the information in this video
3 Points: AP Central MCQs (The Red Scare)

Due:

8.2 Assignments in Google Classroom

8.2 Assignments

Before we get to the AMSCO Chapter 8.2--the longest chapter in the entire Unit 8--I want you to also keep in mind five unassailable facts: 

(1) Twenty million Soviet Union citizens, civilian and military, in World War II.  Twenty. Million. !!!.That is by far the most of any nation involved in the fighting for WWII.  It is more than French, British, the US, and other Western Allies against the Nazis/Fascists combined. 

(2) Because the US and Britain did not open a western front against the German Nazis until June 1944 (D-Day), the Soviet army was tasked with marching across Europe to defeat the Nazis and Fascists who were in lots of places beyond Germany and Italy, especially in Ukraine, the Baltic nations, and the Balkan region. Lots of folks there loved killing Jewish people, and I mean women and children, too, and they were enamored with fascistic symbols and philosophies. The Soviets were essentially fighting the Nazis and Fascists in Europe alone. The US did most of the fighting in Asia, which is very important, as well, as the war crimes the Japanese soldiers and leaders committed against Korea, China, Philippines, and elsewhere in Asia were horrific, and we were truly liberators in that respect.  

(3) The US economy, untouched by WWII, was at least ten times as strong as the Soviet Union's, and the US was in a much better position to offer economic aid and gain influence other nations throughout all of Europe. 

(4) The US, Britain, and France had invaded the Soviet Union at the end of the First World War to try and overthrow the Soviet Union, and were largely belligerent toward the Soviet Union such that the US was not officially sharing much information with the Soviets throughout WWII, unlike the British. 

(5) The United States intelligence apparatus, and the US leadership, knew, in the immediate aftermath of World War II through the early 1950s, the Soviet Union was not seeking to dominate Western Europe, and were not capable of mounting a military offensive against Western Europe.

Also, when you read  in AMSCO chapter 8.2, and hear in AP Central videos for 8.2, about how Churchill's Iron Curtain speech in 1946 is the "start" of the Cold War, remember and consider (a) Churchill's percentages agreement with Stalin in October 1944, and (b) Churchill's refusal to support a second front until FDR finally forced Churchill to accept it in late 1943, and put together an invasion plan in the first several months of 1944, which refusal to open a second front until late in the war allowed the Soviet Union to take the lead in moving troops into Europe. These two facts alone show Britain was already preparing for a bi-polar world and accepted Soviet spheres of influence in return for the Soviets respecting British and later US spheres of influence.  And it shows the break between FDR's view of a multi-lateral world and Truman's bi-polar world built on permanent war capabilities and war making as part of the US succeeding the British in terms of world domination. Also, consider NATO's formation in 1948-1949,  and then consider how the Soviet Union did not create an Eastern European alliance known as the Warsaw Pact until 1953. 

These are facts I want you to consider before you decide, after reading this chapter, which of the two nations, the United States (US) or the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR), were primarily responsible for the Cold War, and which nation was in the best position to have led in pursuing "detente" or professionally friendly relations.  It also shows how Nixon's decision to pursue peaceful relations with the Soviet Union and China is deeply ironic, as it was leaders such as Nixon who, in the first two decades after WWII, kept the US from pursuing the exact policy Nixon began pursuing once he won election to the presidency in 1968.

8.2 ASSIGNMENT

45 Points: (a) Cornell Notes for AMSCO 8.2 OR (b) write definitions AND explanations for each of the Key Terms by Theme.
3 Points: AMSCO 8.2 MCQs
6 Points: AMSCO 8.2 SAQs (1a, 1b, and 1c ONLY)
4 Points: Watch the two AP Central videos for 8.2 and laugh with me, if you wish, at how the teacher at the elitist private school in Atlanta.  Note his ideological statements, namely (1) his continued language regarding the US need to stop the "spread of Communism," how "poverty breeds Communism," and his metaphor of Communism being some sort of liquid in a bottle, all as if Communism is like COVID or polio, or poison; (2) his view that Churchill's speech in 1946 is what started the Cold War, when you know the US was starting the Cold War with Truman's decision to drop the atomic bombs over Japan to show the Russians we could easily use our bombs against them, too; and (3) his naive belief that the US is a capitalist nation, when we are, in fact, a mixed economy, and how he indirectly has to acknowledge this later in his videos, where he talks about how important it was that the US was using its governmental power (command economy? LOL) in the Marshall Plan, NASA pushing us to the moon and technology, the National Defense Interstate Highway Act, etc.; and  What this again poor sap does not understand is that the US has a capitalist hegemony over the discourse, where we idealize capitalism and demonize socialism.  In the second video, this fellow lies about US actions in Guatemala and Chile, saying the US overthrew the Chilean government because they were "Communist" governments. No, they were not. At all.  This fellow needs to learn more about former US General Smedley Butler and his "war is a racket" speech. But, at least this sap realizes the US role in overthrowing elected governments in those two nations.  For the longest time, high school history classes would not acknowledge that. For the AP Test, however, I believe you will have to provide a conservative or neo-liberal perspective, which is this poor sap's worldview--which is of course decidedly not mine. So, remember to talk about us doing even not-so-nice things because we had to stop the "spread of 'Communism.'"  :)
8 Points: Write two paragraphs for EACH of the two videos, and make sure you are noting the AP Test procedural information.
3 Points: AP Central MCQs (Cold War from 1945 to 1980)

FINAL PART OF ASSIGNMENT:

5 Points: Watch this scene from "Captain America: Winter Soldier" and write one paragraph of four sentences as to what you now think of that scene, assuming you have seen the film, and how you interpret what Zola is saying to Romanov and Captain America in the context of who may have actually won WWII in terms of fascism/Nazism v. communism.  Yes, Martin Scorsese and Bill Maher be damned--and ridiculed to a point of humiliation--for thinking the superhero films of the early part of this century were all mindless entertainment. :)

Due:

8.1 Assignments in Google Classroom

8.1 Assignments

PLEASE DO THESE ASSIGNMENT PARTS IN THE ORDER BELOW.  GOING THROUGH THIS ORDER WILL HELP YOU UNDERSTAND BETTER THE LOOOOOOONG CHAPTER 8.2 IN AMSCO, THE LONGEST OF THE UNIT 8.  WE WILL ALSO BE ASSIGNING FOR SPRING BREAK, CHAPTERS 8.3-8.5, 8.7, and 8.8 (We will read 8.6 in conjunction with 8.9-8.11). TRUST ME ON THIS. SERIOUSLY.  FOR WHAT YOU THINK YOU ALREADY KNOW ABOUT THE POST-WWII PERIOD IS LARGELY PROPAGANDA, AND THE SAME GOES FOR MOST AMERICANS OVER THIRTY.  BY READING AMSCO 8.1 AND WATCHING AP CENTRAL's 8.1 SINGLE VIDEO, YOU WILL HAVE AN INITIAL REAFFIRMATION OF THE CONSERVATIVE/NEO-LIBERAL BIAS THAT PERVADES HOW OUR HISTORY OF THIS POSTWWII PERIOD IS TAUGHT IN HIGH SCHOOLS AND COLLEGE HISTORY INTRO COURSES. IT IS ONLY WHEN ONE DELVES DEEPER INTO HIGHER LEVEL COURSES THAT A DIFFERENT SET OF TRUTHS AND CONCLUSIONS EMERGE. I AIM TO PROVIDE THAT FOR YOU...NOW.


8.1 ASSIGNMENTS


15 Points: AMSCO 8.1 Summarize with three bullet points each of the bolded sections, and then create a bullet point list of the events set forth in the timeline at page 580.
2 Points: Watch AP Central Video for 8.1
4 Points: Two paragraphs summary for AP Central Video for 8.1
3 Points: AP Central MCQs (Contextualizing Period 8)


SUPPLEMTENTAL REQUIRED READING FOR 8.1 AMSCO/AP CENTRAL:


20 Points: Four paragraphs or twelve bullet points for the article "The Berlin Airlift and the Cold War".  NOTE: Don't do what I am starting to see, which is random cut and pastes of sentences, or taking the first paragraph or two and cutting/pasting. I will only give full credit points when I see what are your own summaries of statements and own bullet points that summarize what you are reading.
20 Points: Four paragraphs or twelve bullet points for the article "Did Harry Truman Use Scare Tactics to Get the Marshall Plan Approved?"
20 Points: Four paragraphs or twelve bullet points for the article "From the Shadows of the Cold War," which is a review and overview of David Talbot's outstanding book on the Dulles brothers and the rise of the CIA and National Security State after WWII. Counterpunch is admittedly a left-wing magazine, but the article writer, who I do not know of his other work, accurately summarizes the Talbot book--plus the works of former reporter, and later, academic, Christopher Simpson, formerly of American University (now retired).
20 Points: Four paragraphs and twelve bullet points for the article "New Book Fuels Debate Over Nazi 'Hires'" from the LA Times in 1988, when Christopher Simpson's seminal "Blowback" book was released. 
15 Points: Three paragraphs or twelve bullet points for the article "A War Never Known," which is a review of book from a leading American scholar of the Korean War and the immediate post-WWII era, Bruce Cumings. Note the casualty/death figures at the end of the article, and keep in mind the population of all of Korea (north and south) was about 30 million, so that 3 million dead is 10% of the nation. We lost our minds after Islamic fundamentalist terrorists killed just under 3,000 Americans on 9/11/2001. The Korean War killed the equivalent of 32 million Americans.  And we several times have threatened North Korea's government, before, during, and after the Korean War (1950-1953) with nuclear weapons. Sorta makes us less wondering why the North Korean leadership is so paranoid and quick to kill dissidents.
25 Points: Fifteen bullet points or five paragraphs of this essay-review from The New York Review of Books by Cold Warrior era writer Fred Kaplan. I have my disagreements with the final 20% of the article, but I find it useful and illuminating of the period of the past 30 years, and how much the US has again acted offensively, and feigns surprise that Russian nationalism has reared its head again--Just as we didn't understand why much of Stalin's post-WWII behavior was rooted in that same Russian nationalism.  You know, as if our nation's nationalists would not be for bombing Mexico or Cuba if Putin extended a nuclear umbrella over those two countries and forged close relationships. 
:(

Due:

7.15 Assignments: NO EXTENSION BEYOND DEADLINE FOR FRQ/DBQ TO MARCH 10, 2022 in Google Classroom

7.15 Assignments: NO EXTENSION BEYOND DEADLINE FOR FRQ/DBQ TO MARCH 10, 2022

We will go over this AMSCO chapter in class, as well, as I want us to make together the connections between events identified at page 573 of the AMSCO textbook. THE DEADLINE FOR COMPLETING THE ASSIGNMENT IS MARCH 11, 2022 11:59 PM. 


HOWEVER, THE DEADLINE FOR THE DBQ/FRQ IS A HARD DEADLINE, MEANING NO EXTENSION OF TIME FOR THE DBQ/FRQ.

10 Points: Read and summarize page 572 of AMSCO 7.15 in eight bullet points.
5 Points:  Read page 574 of AMSCO 7.15 and explain (a) what does AMSCO textbook writers say are the major accomplishments of the Progressive and New Deal eras; (b) which economic class dominated Progressive movement and which dominated New Deal movement.
2 Points: Watch AP Central Video
4 Points: Two paragraphs summary for AP Central Video
DBQ/FRQ BELOW:
14 Points: AP Central FRQ (really a DBQ) (Comparison in Period 7, which is the subject of women in the First and Second World Wars) NO EXTENSION PAST FRIDAY, MARCH 11 TO COMPLETE FRQ/DBQ.

Due:

7.14 Assignments in Google Classroom

7.14 Assignments

15 Points: Cornell Notes for AMSCO 7.14.  I love the phrasing on page 567 where the book says, "Party leaders felt that Roosevelt's third-term vice president, Henry Wallace, was considered too radical and unmanageable."  Really? By who?  And are we admitting we are owned by the economic owners of this nation?  Heh.
2 Points: AMSCO 7.14 MCQs
2 Points: Watch AP Central Video (one)
4 Points: Two paragraphs summary for AP Central Video (one video)
3 Points: AP Central MCQs (Postwar Diplomacy Quiz)

10 Points: Write four sentences or bullet points regarding this article from 1977, which exposed again (it had first been exposed in British Foreign Minister Anthony Eden's 1956 memoirs, and later by Churchill himself in the last of his six volume of memoirs) Churchill's duplicitous (meaning without telling the US or FDR personally at the time) move in October 1944 to allow Stalin control of Eastern Europe (including Ukraine) in return for Stalin not assisting any revolutions in Greece or India, both then under British control. This meant telling the Greek and Indian Communist Parties they would receive no Soviet Union support. PLEASE NOTE: Stalin kept to this deal.  Churchill was also duplicitous in acting surprised publicly, as the Soviet Union moved over several years to gain control of nations in Eastern Europe (the Soviets already had Ukraine and most of Poland by 1944). 

NOTE: There is a typo in the WaPo article where it says in paragraph 3 of the article: "And in fact, Churchill never did explain fully to President Franklin D. Roosevelt or the American government precisely what he and Stalin had agreed to in Moscow on Oct. 9, 1977." The year is the year of the article, 1977, and not the year of the agreement, which was 1944.

10 Points: Summarize in four sentences or bullet points the article from History.com regarding the Baruch Plan regarding nuclear weapons. The article does a better job of explanation than the textbook. The textbook language makes it appear the US was sharing nuclear power with the United Nations, when it was demanding it hold a nuclear monopoly--while the US had already dropped two atomic bombs on Japan, and was showing the world "who is boss."  

Ungraded Spring Break reading which will help for the AP Test or make you a much better informed adult citizen: 15 page essay from the late Theodore Draper, a noted historian and researcher, who refutes the usually right wing (but often mainstream) lie that FDR "gave anything away" at the February 1945 Yalta (an island off the coast of Greece) Conference among Churchill, Stalin, and FDR, and their advisers. Beyond the essay, I beg you to never fall for the line that just because FDR administration adviser Alger Hiss (a likely Communist Party member at least through the late 1930s) was one of FDR's advisers, that somehow Hiss led the old and dying FDR to give in to Stalin's demands at Yalta. In fact, during the Conference, Hiss wrote a tough-minded memo telling FDR to reject Stalin's demand to have Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania, among other Baltic Sea area nations given a separate vote in the UN. Hiss, a lawyer who once clerked for Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., was adamant FDR not give in--when FDR and Churchill were already ready to accept Stalin's demand.  Some spy for Russia! :(  One can make a much better argument against Churchill: Churchill had refused to support the US opening a second front against the Nazis, which allowed the Russian army to get through Eastern Europe and towards Berlin in Germany. In late 1943, FDR finally overruled Churchill, and the plan for D-Day, the landing on June 6, 1944, was finally begun to be planned. Churchill continued to express misgivings--in Churchill's defense, he thought the Nazis too strong, having seen his British forces routed at Gallipoli and Dunkirk--that, the night before D-Day, Churchill said to US forces commander, Eisenhower, "If this fails, it's your fault." Eisenhower wrote two draft notes to the president that night, one if D-Day succeeded and one if it didn't. There was much bloodshed, but US led forces did prevail and successfully landed on the French shores at Normandy, and it was the beginning of the true end of the war in Europe against the Nazis. Then, add in Churchill's "percentages" deal with Stalin. It is therefore ridiculous for right wingers to not only rip into FDR, but to laud and praise Churchill's leadership. What you will find as you get older is most foreign policy arguments are essentially extensions of domestic politics.

Due:

7.12 and 7.13 Assignments in Google Classroom

7.12 and 7.13 Assignments

THIS WILL NOT BE A GRADE FOR FIRST QUARTER.  THIS WILL BE THE FIRST GRADE FOR THE SECOND QUARTER.


7.12 Assignments

15 Points: Cornell Notes or define/explain Key Terms by Theme in AMSCO 7.12
3 Points: AMSCO 7.12 MCQs
6 Points: AMSCO 7.12 SAQs (1a, 1b, and 1c ONLY)
4 Points: Watch the two AP Central Videos
8 Points: Write a one paragraph summary for EACH of the two AP Central Videos
3 Points: AP Central MCQs (World War II Mobilization Quiz)

7.12 Subject-Matter Supplemental Reading Assignments

20 Points: Four paragraphs or fifteen bullet points for the Washington Post article, "Bitter Harvest." Your notes should cover the economic numbers, the role of Anglo growers in CA fueling the anti-Japanese-American hysteria and how the internment of Japanese on the west coast was more about economic revenge than national security.  Ironic note that supports the point: Japanese were NOT removed from Hawaii after Pearl Harbor.  Local note: A large number of CA or West Coast Japanese and Japanese-Americans were interned in our state of New Mexico. You may ask: Why were there Japanese nationals in the US?  Because US law allowed Japanese people to move and stay here for decades. However, anti-Japanese and anti-Asian immigration laws made it almost impossible for them to become US citizens. So many of the Japanese-Americans were children or young adults born in the US, and therefore were citizens through birth under the 14th Amendment.


10 Points: Two paragraphs or eight bullet points regarding the article about Dr. Seuss and his political cartoons of the years leading up to, and including, the WWII period, particularly his anti-Asian/Japanese political cartoons. I don't personally buy the argument that the one page in Dr. Seuss' 1947 book,  "And I think that I saw it on Mulberry Street" is particularly racist. For me, the political cartoons were awful and cannot be justified in modern cultural and political terms especially. 

7.13 Assignments

15 Points: Cornell Notes or define/explain Key Terms by Theme in AMSCO 7.12
1 Point: AMSCO 7.12 MCQ number 3 only. Why? I want to show you how the AMSCO book writers know the truth I am laying on you in the Los Angeles Times article in the supplemental reading by the writers' use of the word "publicly" in one of the proposed MCQ answers.  The use of the term "publicly" makes the answer a wrong one to choose because the AMSCO book writers KNOW the Japanese did not publicly make that announcement, but they certainly were implying or sometimes expressing a desire for a peaceful resolution in diplomatic cables and statements. My opinion is that, for AP Test purposes, go with saying something such as "There remains a controversy over Truman's decision to drop atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki on Aug 6 and Aug 9, 1945. However, Truman was more concerned with American civilian casualties." (Not really true, either, but so many Americans need to believe that).
4 Points: Watch the two AP Central Videos
8 Points: Write a one paragraph summary for EACH of the two AP Central Videos
NO AP CENTRAL MCQs for 7.13

7.13 Subject-Matter Supplemental Reading

Ungraded--just look at the Twitter feed of a political-military cartoon from then NM resident--but a soldier fighting in WWII--Bill Mauldin.  The cartoon was a series about two soldiers named Willie and Joe. Mauldin became famous for his military cartoons and later became a political cartoonist.
10 Points: Santa Fe New Mexican article about NM and the Baatan Death March. It is not well known how, since the Spanish-American War of 1898, NM has sent a higher per capita number of soldiers into our wars than nearly every other state in the United States.  That, on top of so many veterans who later move here, largely for inexpensive housing so they can make their military pensions go a longer way. The article shows how NM soldiers were overrepresented in the first wave of soldiers serving in the Asian "war theater" of early 1942. NM soldiers were overrepresented among the soldiers the Japanese captured in the Philippines, and who the Japanese government forced to trek along in ridiculous, grueling high humidity heat through the peninsula known as the Bataan region. 
15 Points: Four paragraphs or fifteen bullet points for the Los Angeles Times article from perhaps one of the two or three top historians who have studied the ample paperwork, and interviews with the leading officials (military, scientific, and civilian) relating to Truman's decision to drop the atomic bombs on Japan. Personally, the only argument one has for Truman's decision is one for revenge and punishment for atrocious Japanese government behaviors before and during WWII. However, the question is whether that punishment against Japanese civilians was or is itself defensible.

Due:

7.11 Assignment in Google Classroom

7.11 Assignment

UPDATE: As you know, this assignment was due on March 3.  At the request of a few of you, I said I would not include 7.11 in Q3. I have now said it is due Saturday, March 5, so it is going to be graded for Q4.


30 Points: Cornell Notes or define/explain all of the Key Terms by Theme in AMSCO 7.11
3 Points: AMSCO 7.11 MCQs
6 Points: AMSCO 7.11 SAQs (1a-c)
2 Points: Watch one AP Central Video for 7.11
4 Points: Two paragraphs summary of AP Central Video for 7.11 (one video)
3 Points: AP Central MCQs (Interwar Foreign Policy Quiz)


Supplemental Reading:

10 Points: MF Blog, the Sequel, my blog. In this post, I explain the cultural and economic definitions of fascism. Fascism's political element, which is an authoritarianism, or even totalitarianism, is self-evident. However, one can be a cultural fascist, an economic fascist, or political fascist, not necessarily all three--though, to get working class support, cultural fascism must be the leading siren call.  I want you to understand the meaning of the two main components of fascism, not only because it is so highly relevant in our time, but also because not having this understanding makes one less likely to fully comprehend the events of the 1930s through the start of the Cold War. WRITE ONE PARAGRAPH WHICH EXPLAINS THE CULTURAL AND ECONOMIC DEFINITIONS OF "FASCISM."

Due:

7.10 The New Deal Assignments in Google Classroom

7.10 The New Deal Assignments

I was going to go over the videos attached below in class today, Feb 24, 2022. As we now have another five day break, courtesy of the snow, I am assigning the videos with one paragraph or two paragraph writings. The overall assignments for the New Deal chapter are listed below in the order I want you to read or view the attachments. However, we are now leading with the three videos I want you to watch BEFORE you read the AMSCO chapter and AP Central Videos. The three videos will illuminate the chapter and AP Central so much more than just starting to read words.  Also, read through my commentary below as it is replacing my oral commentary in class. :)

10 Points: History Brief: the Dust Bowl. Watch this and write five bullet points regarding the facts provided in the video.

10 Points: FDR and the Dust Bowl: Watch this and write five bullet points regarding the facts provided in the video.

10 Points:  FDR Visits Dust Bowl: North Dakota: Watch this and listen carefully to FDR's speech. Note how he provides the bad news with factual and statistical analysis.  Note how he acknowledges the pain and hurt. Then, listen to how he proposes solutions designed to bring people together.  In writing ten bullet points to show us you are comprehending this speech, add a full paragraph to tell us if you think FDR sounds like any modern American politician, and WHY or WHY NOT.  I just don't want to see "FDR sounds like Biden" or "FDR sounds like Trump" and leave it there. I frankly don't think he sounds like either, but that is not the point. The point is to definitely provide a four sentence paragraph of WHY or WHY NOT.

NOW TO THE REST OF THE ASSIGNMENT:

35 Points: Cornell Notes including explaining/defining Key Terms by Theme in AMSCO 7.10. This is another one of those big chapters in this Unit (Unit 8 seems to have less of these, and Unit 9 is only forty pages overall). There is lots of important information very relevant to how we should view current arguments over the role of the federal government.

NO AMSCO MCQs for 7.10.  AGAIN, DO NOT DO ANY OF THE MCQs in AMSCO.

6 Points: AMSCO 7.10 SAQs (2a, 2b, and 2c ONLY.  DO NOT do 1a-c as that is the one which contained the errors of fact regarding unemployment rates and the WPA, PWA, CCC, etc. programs that AMSCO is now going to change due to my research of facts--which they had their committee check out and see if they could confirm. They did. So, what are the TRUE FACTS: (1) When FDR became president, the unemployment rate was 25%.  By 1939, it was 12%.  (2) However, that 12% did NOT count those working in the WPA, PWA, CCC, Federal Theater, Writers, Photographers, Artists project, and other programs. (3) When the workers in those programs are factored in, the unemployment rate in 1939, depending upon the quarter, was 4-6%. You may ask, Why did these people not get counted as employed? Right wing Democrats (of which many in the White dominated South) joined with Republicans to demand this all be called "temporary" work, and that the workers not be deemed employed. They wanted to stop "socialism" and really giving credit to FDR for getting people to work. What is ridiculous is these were years long projects, and far more than a job building a strip mall for three to six months in the private sector.  Finally, to reduce unemployment from 25% to 5% is a big success. The unemployment rate went down further when war began as even Republicans and right wing Democrats like building tanks more than libraries or dams--as if government intervention is okay for war, not peace or infrastructure. As I said above, see how much this resonates into the debates in our time? LOL.

6 Points: Watch the three AP Central Videos, which are important for the three R's: Relief, Recovery, and Reform, and helping to identify the various abbreviation or alphabet agencies that are so important in restoring our nation's stability. The second of the two videos deals with the migration issues--which issue shows up in the AP Central 7.10 MCQs/FRQ--though the teacher is misleading in talking about the Harlem Renaissance as that is the 1920s, not 1930s. You may also catch the teacher's "pro-white South" bias in talking about New York City as one of the "usual suspect" places for African-Americans to go. The teacher obviously doesn't want to dwell on the REASON for the migration of so many African-Americans north and westward, which was state sanctioned and culturally sanctioned violence against African-Americans. Just so you know, Marist high school in Atlanta, GA is an elite oriented private Catholic school that also has more than its fair share of NFL players and coaches, including Sean McVay, the head coach of the recent Super Bowl Champs, the Los Angeles Rams. It is really the elitism that drives this fellow's analysis, plus that genteel racism that infects even a guy with a Hispanic surname. Ugh. 

12 Points: Two paragraphs EACH for each of the three videos

9 Points: AP Central MCQs and FRQ--really the latter is an SAQ (The New Deal Quiz)

10 Points: Three paragraphs or nine bullet points for the Teen Vogue essay on the deporting of the largely Mexican nationals and some American citizens who were of Mexican descent during the period of 1930-1934--after we had let Mexicans come into our country to pick crops. Suddenly, we white folks decided white people needed to do those jobs, as people were desperate for work. Therefore, President Hoover and the Congress decided to deport up to two million Mexicans which included American citizens rounded up, many of whom were the children of these people we invited to work for our farmers and agribusiness.  The deportations stopped by early 1934 as FDR was getting things under control with various job programs, and he realized maybe we can stop this ridiculous and xenophobic (anti-immigrant) solution.

15 Points: Four paragraphs or sixteen bullet points for Adolph Reed, Jr.'s essay in The New Republic: "Why the New Deal wasn't intrinsically racist." Reed, an African-American historian, with a Marxist bent, is fine saying there was racism in American society that permeated into the New Deal. What he is simply saying is it is wrong to simply treat the New Deal as a Whites Only set of policies.  It remains funny to me how the Worldwide Socialist Web (WWSW) was the leading agitator against the NY Times' 1619 Project, and how it is people such as Adolph Reed, Jr. who have the best analyses against corporate diversity training exercises for employees in companies and government.  I guess the Marxists don't like being stuck in with the cultural liberals, who the right wing weirdly call "cultural Marxists." Marx himself wouldn't recognize these corporate diversity trainers as anything other than corporate shills.  Oh well. :)

10 Points: Three paragraphs or nine bullet points for History.com article about the changing line up of Supreme Court Justices, which goes against AMSCO and AP Central's interpretations of the events surrounding FDR's Court Reorganization Act ("Court packing") proposal. This episode in US History is more an early example of right wing corporate media propaganda which is now considered "conventional wisdom," meaning widely accepted. The right wing was the first to call what FDR wanted a "Court packing" instead of anyone else reminding the right wing how presidents or Congress wanting to change the number of US Supreme Court justices had happened before multiple times in US History. Under the Constitution, the Congress, with the President's approval, may change the number of Justices on the US Supreme Court (Article III, Section 1 of the US Constitution). This happened where the Congress and the President exercised this constitutionally permitted power where they believed the US Supreme Court was blocking what were deemed fairly obvious reforms Congress and the President wanted enacted. The AMSCO book claims it is "ironic" that there was a subsequent switch in the voting of at least one Supreme Court justice and how suddenly some of the old justices start. This has the effect on a reasonable reader to make it appear FDR's proposal was a waste and had nothing to do with those two sudden changes. In fact, the two changes were effects of FDR's threat and push for more justices, as even some of the Court's defenders were angry at the then-current Justices' arrogance and doddering foolishness, and wanted to forestall FDR getting his way.  I am surprised the book doesn't mention "A switch in time saved nine," which is a twist on the adage "A stitch in time saves nine" phrase, which has its origins in people who sewed for a living, and the cost of a stitch.  The justice who switched his vote was Stanley Roberts, who was already regarded as a swing voting justice, but who swung toward the FDR administration position after FDR's court plan aroused so much controversy.

Due:

7.9 The Great Depression Assignment in Google Classroom

7.9 The Great Depression Assignment

20 Points: Cornell Notes for AMSCO 7.9.  Note the quote which opens the chapter, and the first paragraph at the first page, page 518, where it speaks of the 1837, 1873, and 1893 economic events as "depressions"--not economic panics. I was taught these were "economic panics" back in my high school days of the early 1970s. The book is correct, my old high school textbooks are wrong.  Note too at the bottom paragraph at page 518 with the information regarding the Stock Market, and how the market had reached all time highs by Sept 1929.  This is why the so-called "smart" people though the late October 1929 crash was merely a "correction." The market did rebound for a few weeks, but dropped hard at the end of 1929 and into the new year of 1930.  The key cause of the Great Depression, though, remains in the stock market speculation paragraph at page 519. That speculation, which saw people putting their savings into stock market investment, and then borrowing from banks, which lent people money to invest (!!!), created a cascading effect that eventually ate up many businesses losing customers, and eventually banks by late 1930 and through 1932. Those who bought stuff (cars, refrigerators, etc.) on installment payments lost their stuff, which only made things worse with overproduction of the stuff and nobody to buy.
3 Points: AMSCO 7.9 MCQs
6 Points: AMSCO 7.9 SAQs


3 Points: Summarize in one paragraph (four sentences) or four bullet points Robert Kuttner's short article from The American Prospect.  Unfortunately, the AP Test folks love blaming the Hawley-Smoot (or Smoot-Hawley) Tariff of 1930 as a major cause of the Great Depression, or at least a significant exacerbator, as does AMSCO on the exacerbation. Go with H-S Tariff as a cause or exacerbator, but don't buy that argument on a personal level.  In addition to Kuttner's points, US foreign trade was only 10% of our economy at the time, and trade with Europe was already declining in 1929 as Europe was already in a depressed market, with millions unable to buy what they were previously buying. That plus Kuttner's points undercut any belief that the Hawley-Smoot Tariff was somehow a significant factor in causing or making worse the Great Depression.


3 Points: Listen to the attached song, and state, in one paragraph of four sentences, or four bullet points, the historical connections socialist lyricist Yip Harburg was drawing, the idea of who built the railroad, or other buildings, and whether Harburg's socialism is informing this song.  The song was a hugely popular when released in the early 1930s--so much that my grandfather, who was born in 1916, and came of age during the Great Depression, would sometimes sing this song to me at various moments we had together in the late 20th Century.   

NOTE: I watched the two AP Central videos and I have decided not to assign those. The MCQs were dull, too, and not worth assigning. The videos are about 20 minutes altogether, but provide no further insight than AMSCO's chapter as far as the AP Test is concerned.  The video was particularly bothersome because the teacher spoke of the 1929 crash and depression in the context of talking about previous "panics"--stating the 1837, 1873, and 1893 economic events were merely "panics."  He never comes out and says what I am saying: The economic events from 1837 forward (which are typical boom/bust cycles in classic capitalist dominated economies) become worse and worse in their effects because the majority of Americans had increasingly moved into urban/suburban areas doing factory or modern white collar work--and were no longer farmers in rural areas. By 1929, a clear majority of Americans lived in urban and suburban areas, after nearly two million Americans had been moving from rural to urban/suburban areas EVERY YEAR during the period of 1921-1928.  That means, if the financiers screwed up the economy, it was no more Farmer John saying to his wife, Madge: "Well, I guess we won't cut up Bessie the cow for meat after all, Madge. We'll hold off buying another cow. Oh, and make sure you do the extra sewing on Johnny's and Mary's pants and dresses. We'll just wait this out."  US society in 1929 had become nearly completely interdependent, which means some government or collective action would be necessary to secure clothing, food, and shelter/housing for millions and millions during an economic downturn most especially.  You know, socialism of one sort or another.  It is not as if the AP teacher in the videos doesn't say there is the change from rural to urban/suburban in terms of population. He does. He just never puts that together, even though his video is about how to build a causation argument. Irony!

Due:

7.7 and 7.8 Assignments in Google Classroom

7.7 and 7.8 Assignments

7.7 Assignments
15 Points: Cornell Notes or explain/define Key terms by Theme for AMSCO 7.7. 
6 Points: AMSCO 7.7 SAQs (1a, 1b, and 1c ONLY)
2 Points: AP Central video
2 Points: One paragraph summary of AP Central video

7.8 Assignments
35 Points: Cornell Notes or explain/define Key Terms by Theme for AMSCO 7.8. A loooooong chapter.
4 Points: AP Central Videos (two)
8 Points: One paragraph summaries for EACH of the two AP Central Videos
3 Points: AP Central MCQs (1920s: Cultural & Political Controversies Quiz)

Supplemental readings and viewings:

10 Points: Two paragraph summary of Washington Post article comparing Trump and Harding
5 Points: Listen to three minute song from Al Stewart, a British progressive folk rock 1970s guy, called "Warren Harding."  Explain in one paragraph (a) the narrative arc of the song, comparing the two main characters, and (b) what information surprised you about what this Brit knows about Harding that many Americans don't. Hint: It's in the references that follow the verse about his going to Alaska.
20 Points: five paragraphs summary or 16 bullet points about how our government and business leaders basically rewrote the society to fit individual car culture--instead of say, mass transit, which would have cost consumers far less.  From the Detroit News website.
5 Points: Watch three minute video about flappers. Write a one paragraph summary or four sentences that (a) define the term flapper; (b) describe their clothes and hair; (c) what advertisers began to sell to women, and (d) what activities the flappers engaged in that were previously considered "unladylike."
15 Points: Read and write four paragraph summary--or twelve bullet points--regarding the story of how American Tobacco hired Sigmund Freud's nephew, Edward Bernays, who had worked in the Wilson administration's propaganda agency, to figure out how to convince millions of women to start smoking outdoors and just as often as men. It shows us how the flapper movement was itself as much a business marketing phenomenon.
10 Points: Write two paragraphs summarizing this review of a great book called "Miss Anne in Harlem." The book is about white women who were enamored with African-American artists in the 1920s, and had friendships, romantic, and sexual relationships with African-American artists. It is noteworthy that the famed Cotton Club in Harlem, which featured African-American performers, did not allow African-American customers.  Imagine that.
15 Points: We don't appreciate Marcus Garvey's intelligence and vision. Full stop. Here is a less than four minute video where we hear his Jamaican accent (he was born and raised there before coming to the US), and how he recognizes and accepts the terms of the racist/ethnic divisional debate to promote an African wide continental nationalism, for better or worse. He even compares the proposal he is making to what the Jews were doing with Zionism and "Palestine," which is what the area was called up through the time Israel was created as a formal state through the United Nations in 1947.  Write a paragraph that explains why, if you were an African-American living through the violence and repression of the 1920s for African-Americans, you would either join with Garvey's movement or reject it. Search deep on this one.

Harlem Renaissance Assignments: Feel the poetry, music, and film

The key issue is Black Pride and using education as a way to show whites and fellow African-Americans why they belong in America and are true Americans. Think of every form of music that has come along in the past 120 years: gospel, jazz, rock & roll, disco, rap, hip-hop. All originate in black communities. All of them. Again, Full Stop.  As Ishmael Reed once said at a panel I attended at the Los Angeles Times Book Festival about 20 years ago: "if it was not for blacks and Jews, America's culture would be like Canada."  Why the Jews? Because the Jews were prominent behind the scenes in writing what becomes known as Broadway and the Great American Songbook, which songs black musicians and singers sang and interpreted.  Jews, of course, were big in developing the film industry, and many performers of the 1920s through 1940s had Jewish religious heritages, though many changed their names to something more Anglo Christian.

Read the attached poems of Claude McKay ("If We Must Die"), Georgia Douglas Johnson ("Heart of a Woman"), and Langston Hughes ("The Negro Speaks of Rivers"), and answer the attached set of questions totaling 39 points.

Ungraded: Twelve minutes, four videos that will give you a strong feel for the cultural diversities within the 1920s period

One minute video of the Christian evangelical preacher Billy Sunday, referenced in AMSCO 7.8. Listen to how he speaks, hear how he gyrates around the stage he is on, and how easily he was caricatured then and now. Substantively, hear how he twists Jesus and the Christian Bible into some capitalist tract, and uses advertising style invective rhetoric.  Catch the use of the word "backslide" or "backsliding" which Sunday uses. He knows his followers and those listening to him are people who go in and out of alcoholism, gambling, or other addictions and overall depression.  He is calling people back from their sliding downward, and helping them up and forward. 

The term "backsliding" shows up with Aimee Simple McPherson in the next attached video I provide for you to watch. This second video is only a few minutes, and is definitely worth seeing how she was clear about using the newest communication technologies, and built what remains the largest church in Los Angeles, the Angelus Temple. And next time you think, "Only rural rubes fall for these people," well, McPherson built her empire in Los Angeles.


Finally, here are two more Harlem Renaissance personages:


First, there is a great a cappella rendition of James Weldon Johnson's most famous poem and song, "Lift Our Voices and Sing."  This is the best version I found that gives strength to the music and especially lyrics. It also speaks indirectly to Black Pride, but to hope in rising above the racism that had become so endemic within our society then.


Second, a video and audio of Harlem Renaissance poet, Countee Cullen, speaking! And then reading his most famous poem, "Heritage," which again goes directly to Black Pride and a back-to-Africa sensibility. Note his voice, and how almost British upper class it sounds.  Yes, we can compare and contrast that with Snoop Dog today and ask ourselves how we got there--though as an old white guy, I hesitate to say anything else. :)

Due:

7.6 Assignments in Google Classroom

7.6 Assignments

15 Points: Cornell Notes or define/explain Key Terms by Theme for AMSCO 7.6
3 Points: AMSCO 7.6 MCQs
6 Points: AMSCO 7.6 SAQs (1a, 1b, and 1c) 
4 Points: Watch AP Central Videos (two)
8 Points: Write two paragraph summary for EACH of the two AP Central videos
3 Points: AP Central MCQs (World War I: Home Front Quiz)

IN CLASS ON MONDAY, FEB 14, 2022, WE WILL GO OVER THE FOLLOWING:

The Watchmen (HBO) opening scene. And yes, Bass Reeves was a real African-American Deputy US Marshal.  See this article if you wish to learn more: 
https://www.britannica.com/biography/Bass-Reeves

Eugene Debs and WWI. See attachment we will go over in class. You should know about the Schenck, Abrams, and Debs cases, stemming from WWI cases, where the US Supreme Court embarrassed itself, as it usually does except for the period most right wingers hate, usually 1948 to 1968, and of course the relatively few miscellaneous decisions that gave truly oppressed people rights.

Due:

World War I: Chapter 7.5 AMSCO and AP Central in Google Classroom

World War I: Chapter 7.5 AMSCO and AP Central

30 Points: Cornell Notes for AMSCO 7.5, and the notes must include an explanation or definition of at least all of the Key Terms. Note particularly pages 478-480, and how the Brits started the naval blockade--it led to mass starvation in Germany--and how US bankers and manufacturers had chosen sides immediately towards Great Britain and France, and how the trade quadrupled with those two nations, and trickled down to nothing with Germany before we decided to declare war 
3 Points: AMSCO 7.5 MCQs
4 Points: watch AP Central Videos (two)
8 Points:  Two paragraph summary of the two AP Central Videos
3 Points: AP Central MCQs (World War I: Military & Diplomacy)


Supplemental readings required for completing assignment:


15 Points: Read Dickinson University blog article about War, Women, and the West, and provide THREE paragraph summary of article, which shows WHY the election went to Wilson.
5 Points: Watch two minute CSpan video of historian talking about the "battle" of Saint Mihiel and write ONE paragraph summary
10 Points: Watch from minute 4 through minute 17 of interview with George Seldes, who was part of the US military press corps, and his discussion of the so-called "battle" of Saint Mihiel, and then notice how the AMSCO book refers to Saint Mihiel at page 484.  Heh-heh.:)  Write TWO paragraph summary of video.
10 Points:  History.com article about how US joined Britain & France to invade Russia to try and overthrow the Bolshevik Revolution in 1918-1919.  Write ONE paragraph summary.

Due:

7.4 Assignments in Google Classroom

7.4 Assignments

35 Points: Cornell Notes or explanation and definition of Key Terms for AMSCO 7.4. Another major and large number of pages chapter!
3 Points: AMSCO MCQs
4 Points: Watch AP Central Videos (two)
8 Points: Summarize in TWO paragraphs EACH of the AP Central Video
3 Points: AP Central MCQs (The Progressives Quiz)

Due:

7.3 Assignments in Google Classroom

7.3 Assignments

35 Points: Do Cornell Notes for AMSCO 7.3, perhaps the single longest chapter (by pages) in the entire AMSCO book
NO AMSCO MCQs
6 Points: AMSCO 7.3 1a, 1b, and 1c (NOT 2a-c)
2 Points: AP Central video for 7.3
4 Points: Summarize in two paragraphs AP Central Video for 7.3
3 Points: AP Central MCQs for 7.3 (Spanish-American War Quiz)
5 Points: One paragraph comment/summary of Mark Twain's not-released-in-his-lifetime rewrite of the "Battle Hymn of the Republic" song
10 Points: One paragraph summary of article from The Smithsonian re: Haiti
10 Points: Two parts: (1) Summarize in one paragraph the video from C-Span of the professor from the US Naval War College (!) in Colorado talking about Maj. Gen. Smedley Butler's analysis of what he did for the United States, or corporate America, and (2) in one additional paragraph, WHY you agree or disagree with Butler. Oh, and don't tell me Butler is "biased," as the professor does. That is, with all respect to this otherwise courageous professor, lazy talk. The key here is to take a stand--and explain WHY Butler is largely right or largely wrong. Hardly any of us is completely right about most things, and we all have biases. :)

Due:

Unit 7: 7.1 and 7.2 Assignments in Google Classroom

Unit 7: 7.1 and 7.2 Assignments

7.1 Assignment:


10 Points: Cornell Notes for 7.1 and ensure you list the timeline information
2 Points: Watch AP Central Video
4 Points: Two paragraph summary of AP Central Video
3 Points: AP Central MCQs for 7.1 (Contextualizing Period 7 Quiz)


7.2 Assignments:


20 Points: Cornell Notes and definitely include ALL of the Key Terms 
2 Points: AMSCO MCQs for 7.2
2 Points: Watch AP Central Video
4 Points: Two paragraph summary of AP Central Video


Supp Reading and Watching:


I have provided, in a single Google Doc, TWO articles from 1893 where two major American figures made conflicting arguments against the other regarding the annexation of Hawaii.  I want you to read the two articles, and then write a RESPONSE in a Google Doc that MUST INCLUDE: 

(1) where you believe Mahan and Schurz accurately predicted the future, and how, and what their limits were in terms of their world views or prejudices (TWO PARAGRAPHS, ONE FOR EACH MAN);

(2) Thinking about the proposition that, "Whatever you are now, you would likely be then": (a) if you were an adult citizen living in the United States in 1893, what would be your position on annexing Hawaii, (b) set forth WHY you would have your position, and (c) WHAT evidence from the articles supports your position. (TWO PARAGRAPHS)

NOTE YOU MUST FULLY ANSWER ALL OF THE SUBPARTS OF (1) AND (2) ABOVE TO EARN FULL POINTS, WHICH IS GOING TO BE WORTH FORTY POINTS FOR THIS SECTION.



THEN, AND ONLY THEN, WATCH THE VIDEO INTERVIEW WITH HIGHLY ESTEEMED MILITARY ORIENTED HISTORIAN, ALFRED McCOY FROM A FEW MONTHS AGO.


IN ONE PARAGRAPH, State what you find in McCoy's analysis that may be similar to Mahan or Schurz, whether the analysis holds today as to why the China (NOTE: Don't get all nationalist against "the" Chinese, as the point should be about what WE as a nation should be doing in our foreign relations and trade development) will overtake the US, and WHY. 


And yes, feel free to wonder why it is we don't have visionary statesmen such as Mahan or Schurz, and instead we have Trump and Biden. Oooh!  Oooh!  I know!  Also, feel free to consider that McCoy is seen in polite elite company to be a "radical" because, as a History grad student in the early 1970s, he investigated and exposed the CIA's involvement in the expansion of the heroin trade during the late stages of the War Against Vietnam under Nixon's administration. Finally, feel free to wonder why McCoy was only on the left-wing, Internet only show, Democracy Now!, instead of CNN, MSNBC, or FoxNews. 


This viewing and writing ONE PARAGRAPH is worth 30 points.

Due:

6.14 Assignment: TEST Level. NO EXTENSIONS AFTER DUE TIME OF FEB 1 6 AM in Google Classroom

6.14 Assignment: TEST Level. NO EXTENSIONS AFTER DUE TIME OF FEB 1 6 AM

TODAY IN CLASS:


We will watch together the AP Central Video for 6.14. It is one video. We will also go over AMSCO 6.14 Chapter.

The TEST will be a DBQ worth 12 Points at TEST Level. The usual breakdown I do, which is double the points for the AP Test, for a DBQ. The DBQ is in the AP Central and will drop at 1:45 pm today.  There is NO need to do anything here, but to do the AP Central DBQ. This is graded as a TEST.  It is due before I grade tomorrow morning, so think of it as Midnight tonight. 


THE TITLE OF THE DBQ IN AP CENTRAL CLASSROOM--YOU MUST SCROLL DOWN SINCE I UPLOADED THE OTHER DAY--IS "19th CENTURY TECHNOLOGY CHANGES QUIZ." But again it is a Test Level for our class.

THERE IS NO EXTENSION OF TIME ONCE I GRADE IT TOMORROW MORNING, FEB 1 AT 6:00 AM.

Due:

6.12 and 6.13 Assignments in Google Classroom

6.12 and 6.13 Assignments

15 Points: Cornell Notes or define/explain Key Terms for AMSCO 6.12
NO AMSCO MCQs for 6.12
6 Points: AMSCO SAQs 1a, 1b, and 1c (NOT 2a-c)
4 Points: Watch AP Central Videos for 6.12 (two)
8 Points: Summarize AP Central Videos for 6.12 in two paragraphs for EACH video 
3 Points: AP Central MCQs for 6.12 (Controversies over the role of government Quiz)


20 Points: Cornell Notes or define/explain Key Terms for AMSCO 6.13
NO AMSCO MCQs for 6.13
6 Points: AMSCO SAQs 1a, 1b, and 1c (NOT 2a-c)
4 Points: Watch AP Central Videos for 6.13 (two)
8 Points: Summarize AP Central Videos for 6.13 in two paragraphs for EACH video 
3 Points: AP Central MCQs for 6.13 (Politics in the Gilded Age Quiz)

Due:

6.11 Assignments in Google Classroom

6.11 Assignments

20 Points: Cornell Notes or explain/define Key Terms by Theme for AMSCO 6.11.
3 Points: AMSCO 6.11 MCQs
6 Points: AMSCO 2a-c SAQs (NOT 1a-c)
10 Points: Read and then write four paragraphs regarding the article Karl Marx v. Henry George*
10 Points: Read and then write three paragraphs regarding the Newsmax article on Henry George*
4 Points: Watch AP Central 6.11 Videos (two)
8 Points: Write two paragraph summaries for EACH of the two AP Central Videos for 6.11
3 Points: AP Central MCQs (Reform in the Gilded Age Quiz)


* Adian and John (Alex) Field did this already for AP Econ. So, they can just take the percentage score on this reading rather than do this portion of the assignment.

Due:

6.10 Assignments in Google Classroom

6.10 Assignments

25 Points: Write out definitions and explanations for every single Key Terms for AMSCO 6.10 or Cornell Notes that must still include them.
NO MCQs in AMSCO for this assignment
6 Points:  2a, 2b, and 2c SAQs (not 1a-c)
4 Points: AP Central Videos (two)
8 Points: two paragraphs EACH for AP Central Videos
3 Points: AP Central MCQs (Development of Middle Class Quiz)

Due:

6.8 and 6.9 Assignments in Google Classroom

6.8 and 6.9 Assignments

6.8 AMSCO and AP Central

10 Points: Cornell Notes for AMSCO 6.8. Note first paragraph and very fast population growth of Chicago. Note all of the Key Terms at end of chapter.
5 Points: Cornell Notes or seven bullet points of Degler and White passages on page 393 in AMSCO 6.8
3 Points: AMSCO 6.8 MCQs
4 Points: AP Central Videos (two)
8 Points: AP Central Videos summaries, two paragraphs each
3 Points: AP Central MCQs (Immigration and Migration Quiz)

6.9 AMSCO and AP Central

15 Points: Cornell Notes for AMSCO 6.9. Note quote from Thomas Bailey Aldrich, who was a poet and commentator, seen by earlier generations as reasonably liberal, but really anti-immigrant and racist.  Note the significant number of Key Terms by Theme and include those in notes.
5 Points: Cornell Notes on Historical Perspectives, at pages 396-397 of AMSCO 6.9.
3 Points: AMSCO 6.9 MCQs
4 Points: AP Central Videos (two)
8 Points: AP Central Videos summaries, two paragraphs each
3 Points: AP Central MCQs (Responses to Immigration Quiz)

Due:

6.7 Assignments in Google Classroom

6.7 Assignments

20 Points: Cornell Notes for AMSCO 6.7, which may be one of the best American textbook chapters for labor of this period I have seen.  I wish it had shown why Ricardo's "Iron Law of Wages" was nonsense, and missed out on how efficiency and union demands would work. The details are important here for context for why many historians now recognize how the US labor-management relations in the period of 1870-1935 were more violent than labor-management in Europe in the same period. 
3 Points: AMSCO 6.7 MCQs
6 Points: AMSCO 6.7 SAQs
4 Points: AP Central Videos (two)
8 Points: AP Central Videos--summaries. For this assignment, two paragraphs each video.

Due:

6.6 AMSCO and AP Classroom Readings and Questions in Google Classroom

6.6 AMSCO and AP Classroom Readings and Questions

20 Points: Cornell Notes for AMSCO 6.6 or definition and explanation of the Key Terms by Theme. Lots here!
3 Points: AMSCO 6.6 MCQs
6 Points: AMSCO 6.6 SAQs 2a-c (NOT 1a-c)
10 Points: Three paragraph summary of the Harvard Business Review article on Adam Smith and the limitations in interpretation of "an invisible hand" (note: not "the" invisible hand)
2 Points: Watch AP Central 6.6 Video
4 Points: write a two paragraph summary of the 6.6 video
3 Points: AP Central MCQs (Rise of Industrial Capitalism Quiz)

Due:

6.5 Readings and questions in Google Classroom

6.5 Readings and questions

15 Points: Cornell Notes for AMSCO Chapter 6.5 or Key Terms, though Key Terms must be included either way. Note again a lot of key terms are listed at page 373.
2 Points: AMSCO Chapter 6.5 MCQs
6 Points: AMSCO Chapter 6.5 SAQs
2 Points: Watch AP Central Video for 6.5
8 Points: Summarize in FOUR paragraphs, and talk about the DBQ points made, for this video. This video struck me as very useful for your understanding for the AMSCO Chapter in terms of providing an overview of how to think about the economic development in the period.

Due:

6.4 Assignments in AMSCO and AP Central Classroom in Google Classroom

6.4 Assignments in AMSCO and AP Central Classroom

15 Points: AMSCO 6.4: Define and explain ALL of the "Key Terms By Theme.
6 Points: AMSCO SAQs.
2 Points: Watch AP Central Video
4 Points: Two paragraph summary of the AP Central Video
10 Points: Summarize in two paragraphs the History.com article about how state conventions and other methods were instituted to systemically deprive African-Americans the right to vote.

Due:

TEST LEVEL: LEQ  in Google Classroom

TEST LEVEL: LEQ

Assignment:  

1. Re-read the first two pages of AMSCO Chapter 6.3, starting with the quote from Frederick Jackson Turner, and focusing on the Turner Thesis.

2. Read this informative essay on so-called "Consensus History" from a midwestern historian, who analyzes and evaluates the book "People of Plenty" (1954), from one of my favorite historians, David Morris Potter (1913-1971). For me, my only quibble with the essay's author is he is too technical in criticizing Potter's view that abundant resources, combined with US- European inventions, provided a basis for reformist ideas, individualism, and democratic/republican values (lower case, as in philosophies, not the modern political parties). I believe Potter was sufficiently specific to make this part of his historical sweep type of analysis. The essay I assigned for you to read, written over thirty years ago, reasonably questions Consensus historians' views while describing and evaluating Potter's now much sadly neglected book.

The LEQ question is as follows:

In describing the Turner Thesis and the Potter Thesis, and limiting yourself to the period of 1607-1900, evaluate the extent to which:


(1) there was a national character for what we call the United States of America 


OR


(2) the sweep of American history from 1607-1900 may be deemed exceptional compared to other nations.

Meaning, you choose (1) or (2), but in either, you must also describe in your own words, the Turner Thesis and the Potter Thesis.

INSTRUCTION FOR LEQ:  To craft your LEQ answer, you should be able to rely on what you have learned in terms of changes over the 1607-late 19th Century period with respect to (a) communication, (b) transportation, (c) agriculture and resources extraction, (d) climate, (e) population growth from Europe and elsewhere to the continent, (f) political philosophy, (g) economic philosophy and policies, and (h) even literature or the arts. And within all that, what is now called settler-colonialism, which is essentially the conquering and erasing of the native peoples who had inhabited North America for a millennium or more. 

I am not saying the LEQ answer has to incorporate more than one of these above issues (a) through (h). You can't. You. Just. Can't. The list is merely to show you why you know more than you think from what you have read in this course, last year's World History course, and perhaps other courses you have taken since 7th grade.

Here is the scoring for an LEQ (and go back to the LEQ videos or the AMSCO book Introduction section if you have any concerns or questions):

0-2 Thesis Statement
0-2 Contextualization
0-6 Evidence
0-2 Historical Reasoning and Complexity

MJF COMMENTS TO HELP YOU BREATHE:

Please understand: The fact there is continued debate among historians about whether there is any consensus in US history is enough to say NO high school student will write a five or six paragraph LEQ that ends the debate. This LEQ is crafted as merely an exercise for you to begin to grapple with the strengths and limits of historical sweeps.  


Also, once you have completed this exercise, and as we traverse the rest of this semester, you will find yourself continuing to wonder about historical sweeps, contextualization, and why the argument over historical sweeps informs our ability to evaluate complex historical information. 

With respect to the AP Test (or if you are not taking the AP Test, then college classes), I am confident your doing this particular exercise of litigating the idea of an historical sweep will improve your ability to (a) write a properly argumentative thesis statement, (b) write a succinct, factual contextualization, (c) identify and discuss evidence, and (d) engage in more complex historical reasoning.

Due:

6.3 Assignments in Google Classroom

6.3 Assignments

10 Points: Cornell Notes for AMSCO Chapter 6.3 
5 Points: Four sentence summary of the two points of view from Marshall and Cozzens in the SAQ page 364. Do NOT do the SAQs.
2 Points: AMSCO 6.3 MCQs 
4 Points: AP Central 6.3 videos (two videos)
8 Points: AP Central 6.3 videos--do summaries of two paragraphs for each of the two videos
3 Points: AP Central MCQs (Western Expansion Social & Cultural Quiz, questions concern Native Americans)

Due:

Winter Break Assignment in Google Classroom

Winter Break Assignment

Over Winter Break, to ensure we are getting off the ground well for a relatively short second semester (due to our having the AP Test in early May, and our need to complete our course by April 4, 2022, and historically, be through at least the election of Obama in 2008), I am assigning  AMSCO and AP Central Classroom Chapters 6.1 (a two page introduction chapter) and 6.2.  Here are the specifics of the assignment, which you would very wise to complete EARLY in the break. If you wait till the weekend it is due, and you don't have any excuse that is health or family emergency related, you will be starting the second semester behind, and that is a bad thing as we are going into overdrive:

15 Points: AMSCO Chapter 6.1 Cornell Notes. Pay careful attention to the breakdowns here re: economic change, political change, and migration/immigration and urbanization, as well as reform efforts.  We need a lot of context for this Unit 6, as it is not only needed to help explain just what was happening in a society continuing to develop complexities, but also to simply being able to explain it all.  As you will see in the AP Central 6.1 video, the theme of this chapter, from an AP Test perspective, is Context.  This set of notes, therefore, should be longer than the two short pages in the book, especially when you go through the timeline at page 347.
20 Points: AMSCO Chapter 6.2 Cornell Notes. There is A LOT in this chapter, and it manages to avoid (for complexity's sake) the mass murder and land stealing against Native Americans, which is discussed later.  I believe it was relatively wise for the book writers to start here, as this opening discussion meets our pro-American sense of adventure and "discovery."  I think even Gen-Zers are not ready for a narrative that leads with settler-colonialism. :)  What is sneaky about this chapter is the chapter starts with such traditional fare as adventure and "discovery," but ends up talking about why farmers had to start the Grange Movement.  Just wait to you get a load of how brutally we treated factory workers, particularly when they thought they should have economic democracy or at least a union.  Heh.
3 Points: AMSCO Chapter 6.2 MCQs.
12 Points: AMSCO Chapter 6.2 SAQs.  
4 Points: Watch two videos: One for AP Central Classroom 6.1 and 6.2
8 Points: Summarize the two videos of 6.1 and 6.2
6 Points: AP Central MCQs (Contextualizing Unit 6 Quiz and Economic Development Quiz)

PLEASE READ THIS MJF ADDITIONAL COMMENT:  To further develop what Chapter 6.1 is trying to tell the students who read AMSCO and watch the AP Central Videos, the key to understanding the politics, culture, and economy that develop in the late 19th Century of US History, including not only (a) the so-called "Indian" Wars, which branch into (b) largely white rancher and farmer wars, (c) the wars between bankers and farmers, (d) the class oriented struggle between labor and capital--which in turn is complicated by (e) immigrants, exploitation of immigrants, and workers' anti-immigrant fervor, plus (f) the horrible racism against African-Americans, Asians, and Hispanics, is to recognize (1) not only is this all very complicated, and not well understood beyond most intellectual circles, but (2) nearly everything that occurs in the 1870s through 1890s remains in echoes or reverberations with us today.  

However, I guarantee this: If you engage with this Unit, and supplemental readings, you will have a much better and deeper understanding of TODAY'S American politics, economics, and culture, and why, if, heaven forbid, our nation finally collapses in the next decade, you'll at least  have understood it is not so much the last steps from current politics, as something a long time coming, which could have been avoided, but...nah. It is said people who don't know history are doomed to repeat it. It is sadly less recognized that people who DO know history are doomed to have to watch it unless they can get into a position of influence or start a movement--as they can't explain this stuff to every single person they know. Too little time, and too much cognitive dissonance to overcome. In high school, though, you are, sadly or not, a captive audience!  Bwaa-ha-ha-ha-ha!

I will say, though, for those who are thinking of dropping the class and going into regular US History, they get quite a bit of this stuff, but without the type of Cornell Notes and drilling.  :)

Due:

FINAL: DBQ in Google Classroom

FINAL: DBQ

Thesis: 0-2
Contextualization: 0-2
Evidence: 0-4
Evidence Beyond the Documents: 0-2
Analysis and Reasoning: 0-2


CHOOSE ONE OF THE FOLLOWING DBQs:


1. Pages 343-345 DBQ at end of Unit 5
2, One DBQ assigned from AP Central Classroom
3. One DBQ assigned from AP Central Classroom

Due:

Reconstruction alternative assignment for today's class in Google Classroom

Reconstruction alternative assignment for today's class

Make sure you have your computers or paper/pens out for today's class. I was going to have you watch the PBS Reconstruction series (four hours) over Winter Break, but it is now off YouTube (suddenly, for reasons I don't know).  It is too bad, as it is so awesome. However, I will now have to give you a more complete perspective than the textbook in one class, though the textbook is fairly good.  

We will also watch the videos attached below.  

Due:

A closer look at 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments and continuing controversies in Google Classroom

A closer look at 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments and continuing controversies

These Post-Civil War Amendments, the 13th (end to slavery), 14th (national rights and other matters), and 15th (right to vote) have revolutionary implications, but have loopholes, whether in the language itself of each, or through Supreme Court precedent that limited the scope that was so promising to African-Americans and others who have suffered invidious discrimination or worse.

Read through the attached documents, answer, and submit through Google Docs the Exit Tickets for the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments.

NOTE TO AIDAN J-Q AND ALEX FIELD: You both did these already in AP Gov/Politics. If you wish me to transfer your grades here, you can avoid having to re-answer the questions.

Due:

5.11 Assignments in Google Classroom

5.11 Assignments

This is due Thursday night. HOWEVER, in class on Wednesday and Thursday, I am going over a detailed review of the Post-Civil War/Reconstruction Era amendments, that is the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments. The book does a good job, but not good enough, in explaining the significance and the effects of the amendments down through our own time.  The regular US History folks did these readings and exit tickets (as I called them), but I wanted you to have these to understand and review, too, and will have those  exit tickets due Sunday, December 12, 2021.  So, let's make sure we complete the 5.11 assignments below by Wednesday night.


15 Points: Cornell Notes for AMSCO 5.11  
10 Points: At end of AMSCO 5.11, summarize in three paragraphs the Historical Perspectives at pages 335-336
3 Points: AMSCO 5.11 MCQs 
6 Points: AMSCO SAQs
2 Points: AP Central video for 5.11
4 Points: AP Central video summary for 5.11

Due:

5.9 and 5.10 Assignments in Google Classroom

5.9 and 5.10 Assignments

10 Points: AMSCO 5.9 Cornell Notes
3 Points: AMSCO 5.9 MCQs
25 Points: AMSCO 5.10 Cornell Notes (look at page 330 and see the extensive Key Terms by Theme, as to why this needs to be well understood and detailed notes-taking)
2 Points: AMSCO 5.10 MCQs
2 Points: AMSCO 5.10 SAQ 2(c) (Last SAQ on page 331)
2 Points: AP Central Video for 5.9 (one video)
2 Points: AP Central Video summary (note its focus on Lincoln's administrative leadership, which is vital in understanding Lincoln's greatness)
3 Points: AP Central 5.9 MCQs (Government Policies During the Civil War Quiz)
4 Points: AP Central 5.10 Videos (2 videos)
8 Points: AP Central 5.10 Videos (2 Videos) summaries (two paragraphs each video)
3 Points: AP Central 5.10 MCQs (Reconstruction)

Due:

5.6, 5.7, and 5.8 Assignments in AMSCO and AP Central Classroom in Google Classroom

5.6, 5.7, and 5.8 Assignments in AMSCO and AP Central Classroom

NOTE: The assignments are more about reading, note taking, and watching the videos. Not so much MCQs, SAQs, etc. I am uploading this now because I want to send a message to those behind in assignments to effectively use this week off of Thanksgiving to submit missing work. It is going to be a whirlwind from November 29th through Finals.

20 Points: 5.6 AMSCO Cornell Notes
20 Points: 5.7 AMSCO Cornell Notes AND Historical Perspectives at pages 301-302. That two pages are the leading example of the "politics of History" and the battle over Historiography, or how History intertwines with Philosophy and forms our worldviews. For so many decades, beginning in the 1880s and through the 1960s, the historians, as a profession, pushed a narrative that was essentially pro-Confederate or did a "both sides" type of analysis that obscured slavery as a driving factor of the US Civil War. It was, worse, racist in many ways, and, initially proud of the racism, though later, by the 1910s, defensive and in denial about that racism.
20 Points: 5.8 AMSCO notes, not Cornell Notes for this one. For this one, I think it best to read through, and then summarize the political differences of the CSA and the US government, the economic and cultural differences that developed between the North and South. Then, LIST the battles (city/town and State), who won and whether it was pivotal in terms of winning or losing the war.  And note in one paragraph about the war ships Monitor and Merrimac, and another paragraph about Trent and Alabama war ship situations.  I think the chapter notes will not be short, but they will hit the essence of the information provided in the chapter.
6 Points: AP Central Classroom videos, one for 5.6, one for 5.7, and one for 5.8
6 Points: AP Central Classroom videos: do two paragraph summaries or screenshots of important information for EACH, so at least six paragraph overall or more
6 Points: AP Central Classroom MCQs for 5.6 (Failure of Compromise Quiz) and 5.8 (Military Conflict in the Civil War Quiz).

Due:

Adult Versions of the Road to and Including the American Civil War (1861-1865) in Google Classroom

Adult Versions of the Road to and Including the American Civil War (1861-1865)

There are two PowerPoints I will go over in class on Nov 29, Nov 30, and maybe part of Dec 1. The PowerPoints are Parts I and II of the Adult Version regarding the US Civil War. 

I had made for the regular US History class at the start of the school year, as I believe the book is too summary in phrasing and antiseptic in its phrasing.  The PowerPoints provide a context and power for you to write an LEQ or even a DBQ for an AP Test. See attached.


During the week of Nov 29-Dec 6, I will also be assigning AMSCO and AP Chapters 5.6, 5.7, and 5.8. These will be separate assignments, as I want to keep us moving--and I believe the PowerPoints will strengthen your understanding of the text chapters 5.6-5.8.  

If you wish to look at these during the 10 day break, you should find them interesting enough--and you can confuse many of your relatives as they won't be able to tell whether you are liberal or conservative in what you describe as learning. You may wish to answer such a question by saying: "It is not about being 'liberal' or 'conservative.'  It is about being informed and realizing people and events are often not so simple--except the Southern States definitely were primarily motivated to secede to maintain slavery. Pretty much everything else is complicated."  LOL.

Due:

5.3, 5.4 and 5.5: AMSCO and AP Central Classroom reading and questions in Google Classroom

5.3, 5.4 and 5.5: AMSCO and AP Central Classroom reading and questions

10 Points: Cornell Notes for AMSCO 5.3
3 Points: 5.3 AMSCO MCQs
2 Points: Answer ONLY 1(a) SAQ in AMSCO 5.3, page 275
10 Points: Cornell Notes for AMSCO 5.4
2 Points: 5.4 AMSCO MCQs
NO SAQs for 5.4
10 Points: Cornell Notes for AMSCO 5.5
2 Points: 5.5 AMSCO MCQs
6 Points: 5.5 AMSCO SAQs
8 Points: Watch 5.3, 5.4, and 5.5 videos (4 videos)
16 Points: Summarize 5.3, 5.4, and 5.5 videos (4 videos) with one paragraph EACH
6 Points: AP Central MCQs: Mexican American War and Compromise of 1850 Quizzes

THE PLAN: 

POST THANKSGIVING THROUGH MID DECEMBER FINAL: We will go over the PowerPoints I prepared for regular US History regarding the Civil War, as the chapters 5.6-5.8 are too much summarizing of information you need to know to write with true context and analysis. We will, though, be assigning 5.6-5.8 for that week, but you won't have as much time to work on in classes that week. We will complete Unit 5 (up through 5.12 by the end of the second week of December).  For our Final, we will do a DBQ in class, which will be leniently graded. What I am seeking in the Final is effort and an understanding of how to structure a DBQ. 

FOR WINTER BREAK: I am still thinking we should watch the 4 hour Reconstruction series on PBS as it provides such a great understanding of Reconstruction and Beyond in terms of African-Americans and America.  I have four sets of questions that you would answer during your watching of each one hour episode. This winter break assignment will help us move confidently into Unit 6, and keep us mindful of how so many of the other things that happen, in terms of the revolution in transportation, the amazing rise of European and other immigrants tot he nation, the rise of national corporations and power, and labor reactions to corporate interests and to each other as workers, are often intertwined in ways we normally don't think about.

Due:

Unit 5, Chapters 5.1 and 5.2 in AMSCO and in AP Central Classroom in Google Classroom

Unit 5, Chapters 5.1 and 5.2 in AMSCO and in AP Central Classroom

10 Points: Cornell Notes for Unit 5.1 Intro, but note landmark events and how much it includes. Use your notes as a way of a detailed summary that portends what you will learn in detail.  And again note the timeline has a lot of info not in the short summary.
20 Points: Cornell Notes for Unit 5.2. This is a long chapter (7 pages) chock full of information.  Look at how many key terms there are at page 268. That tells you this should be at least four pages or more.
25 Points: Read and write a full three paragraph summary of this article from New York Review of Books called "Anti-Rent Wars," which juxtaposes the 1840s rent strikes and rebellions, and what we are seeing now.  It does show us what some radical economists and philosophers say is a working definition of capitalism, which is "Accumulation through dispossession."  I am making this 25 points because I am looking for your ability to comprehend what you are reading and to write a detailed response that consists of three full paragraphs.
2 Points: Watch AP Central Video 5.1 Video
4 Points: Watch AP Central Video 5.2 Videos (2 videos)
12 Points: Write a two paragraphs or more SUMMARY for EACH of the THREE videos.
6 Points: AP Central Classroom MCQ questions (six questions; Contextualizing Period 5 Quiz, and then the next three quiz questions--I could not bundle these--about the railroad and Manifest Destiny)


NO GRADE, BUT THOUGHT YOU'D LIKE TO SEE THE ILLUSTRATIONS OVER THE 19th AND EARLY 20th CENTURIES FOR THE FRANCIS PARKMAN BOOK, "THE OREGON TRAIL," FIRST PUBLISHED AS A SERIAL IN A MAGAZINE IN 1847-1848, AND THEN IN BOOK FORM IN 1849. THREE FAMOUS ARTISTS DID THE ILLUSTRATIONS OVER TIME: FREDERIC REMINGTON, N.C. WYETH (ANDREW WYETH'S DAD) AND THOMAS HART BENTON. I HAPPEN TO HAVE A 1925 EDITION OF THE BOOK WITH THE WYETH ILLUSTRATIONS, WHICH I PERSONALLY LIKE BEST. :)

http://xroads.virginia.edu/~Hyper/OREGON/toc.html


AND HERE IS WIKI ON FRANCIS PARKMAN, WHO I DO HAVE A SOFT SPOT FOR...DESPITE HIS NO LONGER BEING POLITICALLY CORRECT. HIS PROSE IS AKIN TO READING A MYSTERY NOVEL AND HE IS FLAMBOYANT IN AN ELEGANT WAY WITH THAT PROSE.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Francis_Parkman






Due:

Unit 4 TEST: LEQ. NO EXTENSIONS OF TIME in Google Classroom

Unit 4 TEST: LEQ. NO EXTENSIONS OF TIME

NOTE: This LEQ TEST is due by the deadline of 11:59 November 10 (Wednesday). There are NO EXTENTIONS. In addition to having tonight, tomorrow night, and even Wednesday night, to do this LEQ, you will be provided time in class to do the LEQ on Tuesday, November 9.  


(On Wednesday, November 10, I will provide an overview of Unit 5, which is going to take us through the end of the semester and the end of Reconstruction, and an assignment for Veteran's Day weekend. The first two chapters and questions in the book and AP will be due next Sunday night, November 14).  

For your LEQ, choose among the following LEQs that are listed on page 256 at the end of Chapter 4.14: 

#1, #6, #7, OR #8.  Choose only ONE.

In your LEQ response, you will be assessed on the following.
Respond to the prompt with a historically defensible thesis or claim that establishes a line of reasoning.
Describe a broader historical context relevant to the prompt.
Support an argument in response to the prompt using specific and relevant examples of evidence.
Use historical reasoning (e.g., comparison, causation, continuity or change) to frame or structure an argument that addresses the prompt.
Use evidence to corroborate, qualify, or modify an argument that addresses the prompt.
Scoring:

0-2 points Thesis statement

0-2 points Contextualization

0-4 points Evidence

0-4 points Analysis and Reasoning

Again, make sure your thesis statement is an argument that is specific, not general or a tautology (look up tautology if you don't know the meaning:)).  If you have a sense your argument has a counterargument, that is where you put in the counterargument in the analysis and reasoning.  

I provide for your assistance four attachments: (1) Word document about writing a Thesis Statement; (2) Steve Heimler's How to Write a Thesis Statement video;  (3) Steve Heimler's How to Write an LEQ and (4) Steve Heimler's overview of Unit 4 from the perspective of the issue of the Market Revolution. I found this particular video helpful in formulating a response to antebellum era questions (1820-1860).

Due:

4.14 Part I, Causation, AP Central videos, notes, and practice questions in Google Classroom

4.14 Part I, Causation, AP Central videos, notes, and practice questions

5 Points: Read and summarize 4.14 (three paragraphs to read)
5 Points: Read and summarize "Think as a Historian" at page 254
16 Points: Answer the five questions at the bottom of page 254, "Think as a Historian" (two points each for first two questions; 3 points each for questions three, four, and five)
20 Points: Read "Write as a Historian" and write three paragraphs from the information in the section. Then, make the chart for continuities and changes as stated at the bottom of page 255. 


Part II is going to be an LEQ for the weekend. The LEQ will be graded as a TEST.

Due:

4.13 AMSCO and AP Central, and supplemental reading in Google Classroom

4.13 AMSCO and AP Central, and supplemental reading

15 Points: Cornell Notes for AMSCO Chapter 4.13, AND the following, included: (1) The Historical Perspective, pages 250-251 and (2) the passage at page 252 for the SAQs, but there is no SAQ assignment for this chapter.
3 Points: AMSCO MCQs
15 Points: Cornell Notes for Commentary.com review from 1959 of a new edition of the antebellum lawyer George Fitzhugh's ingenious, non-racist defense of Southern slavery, and proto-Marxist attack on the Northern ideals of capitalism and Lockean principles.  Oh, how I wish you had time to read the great C. Vann Woodward (Yale historian of the 20th Century) intro to the 1959 edition of Fitzhugh's book, Cannibals All! mentioned in the AMSCO 4.13 chapter. But, contemporary historian Stanley Elkins' review in Commentary suffices. :)
4 Points: Watch 4.13 two videos
8 Points: Two paragraph summaries for EACH of the 4.13 videos. I am going to grade hard on this demand for at least two paragraphs.
3 Points: AP Central MCQs--"Society of the South" questions

Due:

4.12 AMSCO and AP Central; supplemental reading in Google Classroom

4.12 AMSCO and AP Central; supplemental reading

15 Points: Cornell Notes for AMSCO 4.12 chapter and do Cornell Notes for the two passages at page 246 as they are important items of information (no SAQs for this assignment, as the SAQs are pretty obvious to a point I don't see the need if you do solid Cornell or detailed outline notes. Got that? :))
3 Points: AMSCO MCQs
10 Points: Cornell Notes for the short article in the Zinn Education project website that nicely summarizes slave runaways, slave patrols/catchers, and rebellions among slaves.  The idea that slaves were largely docile is not accurate, as there was grave and continuing violence to keep African heritage people as slaves, and how the number of runaways was remarkably high.
10 Points: Three paragraph summary, not Cornell Notes, after reading the History.com article about the Southern route to freedom to Mexico, and its significance with respect to the Alamo fight for Texas independence, and the road to the US Civil War.  This information is going to help responding to a prompt for an LEQ--or something to add in a DBQ--that asks about what occurred in the antebellum period that was a longer term "cause" for the US Civil War. It also helps to explain why the southerners were so intent on gaining Texas and the southwest in the Mexican-American War (1846-1848), and how their hopes were partially thwarted when CA and the NM territory (which included modern day AZ) decided to enter as "free" territories.
4 Points: Watch both 4.12 videos in AP Central Classroom
8 Points: write two paragraphs for EACH of the two 4.12 AP Central Classroom videos. I will grade hard if this is less than two paragraphs each.

Due:

4.11 AMSCO and AP Central Classroom reading and questions in Google Classroom

4.11 AMSCO and AP Central Classroom reading and questions

10 Points: Cornell Notes for AMSCO 4.11
10 Points: Two pages from a 1966 American Pageant textbook about Carry Nation and the Temperance movement

20 Points: Cornell Notes on "Hatchet Nation" article in Slate.com about Carry Nation and the Temperance movement

3 Points: AMSCO MCQs
6 Points: AMSCO SAQs
4 Points: Two videos for 4.11 in AP Central Classroom
8 Points: Summarize the two 4.11 AP Central Classroom videos
3 Points: AP Central Classroom MCQs

Due:

4.10 AMSCO and AP Central Questions in Google Classroom

4.10 AMSCO and AP Central Questions

This week's plan: 4.10 due Tuesday night; 4.11 due Thursday night (with supp reading of an article to go with chapter).

Next week plan: 4.12 and 4.13, and then hopefully for next weekend (Oct 29-31), 4.14 Causation with DBQ or LEQ. We will start Unit 5 November 2. Anyway, here is the 4.10 assignment:

15 Points: Cornell Notes on this relatively short, but vital AMSCO 4.10 chapter. As you take notes, think about how the Second Great Awakening of non-establishment church religiosity connects to (a) universal white male suffrage, (b) market revolution, (c) attacks on a national bank in favor of local banks and local currencies, and (d) the Transcendentalists' focus on individual philosophy and pursuits.
3 Points: AMSCO MCQs
4 Points: AMSCO SAQs 1(b) and 1(c) only. DO NOT DO 1(a) as the question does not flow to the book writers' answer.  
2 Points: Watch AP Central video for 4.10
4 Points: Summarize with more details and consider screenshots for AP Central video for 4.10
3 Points: AP Central MCQs (Second Great Awakening Quiz)

Due:

Hawthorne, Fuller, Emerson, and Cooper shortchanged in AMSCO book, but not here! in Google Classroom

Hawthorne, Fuller, Emerson, and Cooper shortchanged in AMSCO book, but not here!

Since we have asynchronous classes on Wednesday and Thursday, Oct 13 and 14, I thought you should have an opportunity to read examples of Nathaniel Hawthorne (who wrote "The Scarlet Letter," an attack on Puritanism) and "The House of Seven Gables" (a Gothic tale with flashbacks of a haunted house, suffused with hints of witchcraft and sudden death--or is it murder?), Edgar Allan Poe---yeah, everyone knows him!--on Margaret Fuller, a proto-feminist who was part of the Transcendentalists, and Ralph Waldo Emerson, who began as a Presbyterian pastor, and ended up a heretic who yet remained a believer through Transcendentalism.  The book does enough of a good job on Thoreau, but doesn't mention how, in his living alone, he relied on his mother and sister to do his laundry and prepare food for him when he was unable to hunt or capture food for himself.  That demeans him, I suppose, but he really is influential to Ghandi and Martin Luther King, Jr. for more substantive, societal reasons than perhaps his eccentric individualism is concerned.


20 Points: Read and then write a paragraph summary of "Young Goodman Brown" (see Google Doc below) from Nathaniel Hawthorne, first published in 1835. It is a proto-Twilight Zone, proto-horror story ripe for Halloween. Yeah, that Hawthorne guy.  


20 Points: Read and then write a TWO paragraphs on this Edgar Allan Poe essay on (Sarah) Margaret Fuller, and then write a paragraph summary of this deeply respectful appraisal of Ms. Fuller.


20 Points: Read and write TWO paragraphs on this essay from Emerson called "Politics," which begins with a poem he wrote (for he was known as a great poet, though I can't tell as I am not well trained in recognition of great poetry).  The reason I like this essay is it seems as if it is about individualism, but takes a rather hard left turn when it comes to delineating the differences between democratic values and the role of property in a society. It shows us, once again, how we can quote people from two hundred or even 150 years ago, and realize our opponents today may quote different parts of what they wrote and said.


20 Points: Read and write two paragraphs on this essay from James Fenimore Cooper, in one of his later political writings, "On Demagogues," from the late 1830s.


10 Points: Read and write a summary of this defense of Cooper's pro-white settler biases that cannot otherwise be fully erased in his early novels. Cooper came from wealth, and in fact, grew up in Cooperstown, NY (where the Major League Baseball Hall of Fame is located), named after his wealthy and powerful family.  I do believe this English teacher has a point to be made, as the speeches and actions of the Natives often show them as more noble than those of white settlers in the novels.

Due:

4.9 in AMSCO and AP Central: readings and questions, video in Google Classroom

4.9 in AMSCO and AP Central: readings and questions, video

20 Points: Read and do Cornell Notes for Chapter 4.9 in the AMSCO textbook
3 Points: AMSCO MCQs
6 Points: AMSCO SAQs
7 Points: AP Central MCQs (one is called Transcendental Beliefs MCQ 1, but is really four questions)
2 Points: watch video in 4.9 AP Central Video
4 Points: Summarize in two paragraphs the video.

Due:

4.8 AMSCO and AP Central Videos in Google Classroom

4.8 AMSCO and AP Central Videos

20 Points: Cornell notes on AMSCO 4.8
3 Points: AMSCO MCQs
12 Points: AMSCO SAQs
4 Points: Watch AP Central videos
8 Points: Summarize in two paragraphs EACH of the two videos
3 Points: AP Central MCQs

Due:

4.7 in AMSCO and AP Central reading, Cornell notes, and questions in Google Classroom

4.7 in AMSCO and AP Central reading, Cornell notes, and questions

15 Points: AMSCO 4.7 Cornell Notes (including notes on Historical Perspective section)
3 Points: AMSCO MCQs
6 Points: AMSCO SAQs
4 Points: Watch the two AP Central Classroom for 4.7
4 Points: Summarize the two AP Central Classroom videos for 4.7

Due:

4.5 and 4.6 AMSCO and AP Central notes and questions in Google Classroom

4.5 and 4.6 AMSCO and AP Central notes and questions

I WOULD LIKE TO GO OVER ANSWERS IN CLASS ON MONDAY AS THE MARKET REVOLUTION IS AN IMPORTANT ASPECT OF AMERICAN HISTORY IN WHAT IS CALLED THE ANTEBELLUM PERIOD (1815-1861).  IT IS THE FOUNDATION FOR THE SECOND INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION OF THE 1870s AND PORTENDS THE RISE OF THE FOR-PROFIT PRIVATELY OWNED CORPORATIONS


15 Points: Chapter 4.5 Cornell notes (your notes must reflect all of the Key terms by theme)
10 Points: Chapter 4.6 Cornell notes (same with these notes)
6 Points: AMSCO 4.5 and 4.6 MCQs
18 Points: AMSCO 4.5 and 4.6 SAQs
3 Points: AP Central MCQs (see attached document)

Due:

AMSCO Chapter 4.4, MCQs, and SAQs, plus AP Central MCQs in Google Classroom

AMSCO Chapter 4.4, MCQs, and SAQs, plus AP Central MCQs

20 Points: 9 page chapter 4.4 Cornell/detailed outline notes
3 Points: AMSCO MCQs
6 Points: AMSCO SAQs
3 Points: AP Central MCQs (attached Google Doc)

Due:

Chapter 4.3 Notes and Questions in Google Classroom

Chapter 4.3 Notes and Questions

15 Points: Cornell Notes for AMSCO Chapter 4.3
10 Points: Slate.com article from this past week about John C. Calhoun and the right wing/slaveocracy opposing internal improvements or what we now are calling infrastructure 
3 Points: AMSCO MCQs
6 Points: AMSCO SAQs

Because I am still unable to assist the two scholars having access problems, I cannot formally assign the AP Central Classroom videos, which, for this chapter, we will watch, in class, the two 4.3 Videos. If you wish to summarize for yourselves, I would strongly suggest you do so on your own time for your own studying purposes.  

I was going to assign the three MCQs in AP Central for this chapter, but they were ridiculously easy. I instead ask you to read this passage that was the basis for the chapter. If you read the AMSCO Chapter 4.3 and watch the second of the two AP Central videos, you will see the significance of this passage as to why Henry Clay is a successor to Hamilton and why one draws a connection between Hamilton to Clay to Teddy Roosevelt and then to Franklin D. Roosevelt (the New Deal).  Here is Clay in 1824, speaking as the Speaker of the House, and therefore the single most important Congress person at the time:

“The creation of a home market is not only necessary to procure for our agriculture a just reward of its labors, but it is indispensable to obtain a supply of our necessary wants. . . . Suppose no actual abandonment of farming, but, what is most likely, a gradual and imperceptible employment of population in the business of manufacturing, instead of being compelled to resort to agriculture. . . . Is any part of our common country likely to be injured by a transfer of the theatre of [manufacturing] for our own consumption from Europe to America?

“. . . Suppose it were even true that Great Britain had abolished all restrictions upon trade, and allowed the freest introduction of the [products] of foreign labor, would that prove it unwise for us to adopt the protecting system? The object of protection is the establishment and perfection of the [manufacturing] arts. In England it, has accomplished its purpose, fulfilled its end. . . . The adoption of the restrictive system, on the part of the United States, by excluding the [products] of foreign labor, would extend the [purchasing] of American [products], unable, in the infancy and unprotected state of the arts, to sustain a competition with foreign fabrics. Let our arts breathe under the shade of protection; let them be perfected as they are in England, and [then] we shall be ready . . . to put aside protection, and enter upon the freest exchanges.”

Due:

Unit 4: 4.1 and 4.2 Cornell Notes and Questions in Google Classroom

Unit 4: 4.1 and 4.2 Cornell Notes and Questions

10 Points: Chapter 4.1 Cornell Notes
15 Points: Chapter 4.2 Cornell Notes
3 Points: Chapter 4.2 MCQs
6 Points: Chapter 4.2 SAQs
3 Points: AP Central Classroom MCQs (reprinted as Google Doc below for all scholars)


Watch the videos for 4.1 and 4.2. We will watch these in class on Thursday, September 23, 2021 so that those without access can see them.

Due:

UNIT 3 Long Essay Question. This is graded as a TEST. in Google Classroom

UNIT 3 Long Essay Question. This is graded as a TEST.

NOTE: This is due by the deadline of 11:59 September 22. There are NO EXTENTIONS. You will have time to do this in class on Tuesday, September 21, and Wednesday, September 22.  CHOOSE ONE OF THE TWO LEQs:

FIRST LEQ: Evaluate the extent to which ideas of self-government influenced American colonial reaction to British imperial authority in the period from 1754 to 1776.

SECOND LEQ: Evaluate the extent to which economic factors in the period from 1763 to 1776 were the primary cause of the American Revolution.


In your response, you will be assessed on the following.
Respond to the prompt with a historically defensible thesis or claim that establishes a line of reasoning.
Describe a broader historical context relevant to the prompt.
Support an argument in response to the prompt using specific and relevant examples of evidence.
Use historical reasoning (e.g., comparison, causation, continuity or change) to frame or structure an argument that addresses the prompt.
Use evidence to corroborate, qualify, or modify an argument that addresses the prompt.


Scoring:


0-2 points Thesis statement


0-2 points Contextualization


0-4 points Evidence


0-4 points Analysis and Reasoning


Again, make sure your thesis statement is an argument that is specific.  If you have a sense your argument has a counterargument, that is where you put in the counterargument in the analysis and reasoning.

Due:

3.11 and 3.12 Reading, Notes, and Questions in Google Classroom

3.11 and 3.12 Reading, Notes, and Questions

10 Points: Cornell Notes for 3.11
10 Points: Cornell Notes for 3.12
NO MCQS for 3.11
3 Points: MCQs for 3.12 
6 Points: SAQs for 3.11
6 Points: SAQs for 3.12
4 Points: Watch AP Classroom videos, as they provide important information on LEQs, which we will be doing next week to complete Unit 3
8 Points: Summarize with two or more paragraphs each of the two videos (note this is double the usual number of points, as I mean it, you will see why these two videos are important)


If you are still having AP Classroom access problems, I will attach below two YouTube videos for you to watch and provide two paragraph or more summaries about from Heimler on AP US History.  He is very good, too.

Due:

Chapter 3.10 Notes and Questions in Google Classroom

Chapter 3.10 Notes and Questions

15 Points: AMSCO Chapter 3.10 Cornell Notes, etc.
3 Points: AMSCO MCQs
6 Points: AMSCO SAQs
3 Points: AP Central MCQs (I have reprinted them as Google Docs, attached below, rather than have anyone put into the AP Central directly)


If you have access, watch the three AP Central Videos 3.10.  I would like to give points, but we still have scholars having access problems.

Due:

Chapters 3.8 and 3.9, plus MCQs and SAQs (plus AP Central videos if accessible) in Google Classroom

Chapters 3.8 and 3.9, plus MCQs and SAQs (plus AP Central videos if accessible)

15 Points: 3.8 AMSCO Cornell Notes (note chart at page 126 and Key Terms)
3 Points: AMSCO 3.8 MCQs
6 Points: AMSCO 3.8 SAQs
10 Points: AMSCO 3.9 Cornell Notes 
3 Points: AMSCO 3.9 MCQs
6 Points: AMSCO 3.9 SAQs (I get a kick out of Beard in my old age, but I adore Hofstadter's insights for most of what he wrote, except for his most famous essay on Paranoid politics in the US is too ripe, and not up to his usual insightfulness. I have and read the book from which the passage is taken. :))


Suggestion: 1st and 3rd videos for 3.8 and 3.9.  


I would like to give points, but in fairness cannot, as some are still having AP Central Classroom access problems. I would strongly suggest those scholars seek Geek Squad or some other similar help as it is hurting the class to not have AP Central Classroom access for MCQs and other assessments.

Due:

3.6 and 3.7 AMSCO book: Cornell Notes, SAQs, and MCQs in Google Classroom

3.6 and 3.7 AMSCO book: Cornell Notes, SAQs, and MCQs

10 Points: Cornell Notes for 3.6
10 Points: Cornell Notes for 3.7
3 Points: AMSCO MCQs for 3.6 
6 Points: AMSCO SAQs for 3.6
3 Points: AMSCO MCQs for 3.7
6 Points: AMSCO SAQs for 3.7


I am hesitating to have you get points for watching the AP Central videos as some are still having access problems.  However, I strongly recommend you watch the three videos for 3.6 and the second of the two videos in 3.7.  I truly believe you will find these videos helpful in identifying historical perspectives and make for effective analysis in SAQs and Long Essay Questions (LEQs).


Preview: For the upcoming weekend, we will be assigning 3.8 and 3.9, as those two chapters are best read together, as well.  Next week, we will move toward completing Unit 3, meaning you will be getting another DBQ to end Unit 3 for the following weekend (September 18-22).  I am giving you this preview so that you do not become complacent, and realize we are definitely in a trot if not a full run at this point.  I want us to also take note that the passages in the SAQs and MCQs continue to be very good in providing you an understanding of historians' perspectives. I loved the citations to Beard and Hofstadter in the end questions in 3.9, for example, having also read both works cited over the years. The Washington Farewell Address passage later in Unit 3 is great, too. :)  These passages build up your ability to describe historical perspectives.  

Due:

Labor Day Plus

Labor Day Plus "Assignment"

I note a third of you have NCs in the course so far, and progress reports have reflected that. In all candor, that is not indicative of how an AP class should be behaving. I further note a near majority have not completed the readings for 3.4 and only two have completed 3.5.  3.4 was due this past Thursday, and 3.5 is due tonight.


I therefore find, with our current pacing, I can provide a catch-up day tomorrow in class. However, continue making up time today, and don't let this be an excuse for doing nothing. For Wednesday, we roll into 3.6 and 3.7. I am particularly impressed with the text for 3.6 in understanding the extent to which the NY Times' 1619 Project overstated slavery as an issue in 1776, but do not let anyone tell you slavery was not an issue in 1787 when the Constitution was being debated. 


Please note, too, I have become hesitant to assign AP Central Classroom as some of you are suddenly having trouble accessing it. Hopefully, we will get updates from you by tomorrow as to what you have learned from AP Central. My sense is you should change your browser for this class to Google Chrome, especially if you are using Safari or possibly Firefox.  It is just one of those things sometimes...


For 3.6 and 3.7, I will be assigning AMSCO MCQs and SAQs for those who catch up and want to keep rolling. 


I wish to be clear about tomorrow's class is.  Tomorrow will NOT be one where I let you read some fiction book of your own choosing, play on the computer, or otherwise not do work for this class. This time is specifically geared toward showing respect for this class and the assignments which have been assigned. As I look over some of you whose grades are at NC, and see you are doing well in most other classes, I have concluded there is a lack of respect for this AP Class that must cease NOW.


If you are caught up, you are to begin work on AMSCO notes for 3.6 and 3.7 in tomorrow's class.


Final thoughts for the day: In honor of Labor Day today, you may wish to study the graph attached below. Yes, one may say, "But is that merely correlation, not causation?" Perhaps. But, I think it is more than a correlation, which is often enough for epidemiologists when studying reasons for diseases. This is especially true if one reviews Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) analyses, Federal Reserve Board analyses, and other governmental analyses over the decades.  The loss of manufacturing jobs from corporate-benefiting trade deals would also be consistent with the analysis as well.  Happy Labor Day.

Due:

3.5 AMSCO and AP Central Classroom in Google Classroom

3.5 AMSCO and AP Central Classroom

15 Points: Cornell/Detailed Outline Notes 
3 Points: MCQs
6 Points: SAQs
4 Points: Two videos for 3.5 in AP Central Classroom
4 Points: Summary of each (note the second video is a how-to or strategy type of video for the AP Test. Please note what is said in terms of strategies or how-to, and also what you learned)

Due:

Chapter 3.4 Notes, MCQs, Videos and AP Central MCQs in Google Classroom

Chapter 3.4 Notes, MCQs, Videos and AP Central MCQs

10 Points: Cornell/Detailed Outline Notes PLUS Historical Perspectives (very important, though short chapter, and note every name or event mentioned, including in Historical Perspectives, describing Bernard Bailyn's thesis about the American Revolution)
10 Points: Cornell/Detailed Outline Notes from Gordon Wood's "The Radicalism of the American Revolution" (Introduction chapter ATTACHED BELOW; it is a different, wider take than Bailyn's). The way to write notes on the Wood reading is to read each paragraph, and, for many of those individual paragraphs, summarize the paragraph. This Intro from his book, a book I highly recommend, summarizes the historiography of the American Revolution, and will help you articulate the competing views of the American Revolution as "conservative" or "radical," and help you write a deeply articulated essay or analysis on the AP Test.

3 Points: AMSCO MCQs
3 Points: AP Central MCQs 
6 Points: Watch all three videos (very important topics and last one includes helpful info on DBQs)
6 Points: Summarize videos (these should be longer than usual, meaning two paragraphs each)

Due:

Notes for 3.1, 3.2, and 3.3 in Unit 3 in Google Classroom

Notes for 3.1, 3.2, and 3.3 in Unit 3

We are going over 2.7 answers to questions (MCQs and SAQs) tomorrow. I am also going over Unit 3's 3.1 for context tomorrow with my commentary.  I am giving a bit of Monday, but all of Tuesday's class to write notes and answer questions. This will ameliorate the fear and loathing you may have at reading three chapters.  I also assign only SAQs, not MCQs or essays.  


I am doing this to get a good jump here. Unit 3 is as long as Units 1 and 2 COMBINED. There are some MAJOR issues crammed into the Unit 3: the Revolution, the Articles of Confederation, the Constitution, and the rise of political parties in the 1790s where we could have fallen into Civil War--but for my other hero who is now better understood than at nearly any time since his death, John Adams (though it is hard to ignore Adams' perfidy in pushing and signing the Alien & Sedition Acts of 1798 and the many attacks on people in the period 1798-1800). However, Hamilton and Jefferson (and Madison) debased themselves through that period as well for differing and significant reasons. See what I mean? Lots of stuff.  


The plan is to get us through Unit 3 in three weeks, and start Unit 4 before the end of September. The larger plan is to get through Reconstruction (1866-1877) before we start up again in January 2022, as again we have an early May 2022 AP Test.  


We can talk about tests, projects, or papers as alternatives to the monotonous movement through the textbook and AP Central Classroom, and whether outside reading is welcome on top of this reading, though I am concerned not having notes will leave you less remembering of any details.  Again, I am open to the discussion. So, here goes for the 3.1, 3.2, and 3.3 assignment:

10 Points: Notes for Chapter 3.1 include the timeline and ensuring you put in the contexts here.  
15 Points: Notes for Chapter 3.2 and remember what I have not said since nearly the start, which is if your notes don't reflect all of the key terms, they are not sufficiently detailed.
15 Points: Notes for Chapter 3.3 and same thing with the many key terms for this chapter.
6 Points: 3.2 SAQs (no, I did not forget the 3.1 MCQs. I am just not assigning them).  Note the phrasing for the three questions, as the first two are about historical events that are "during the war" that demonstrate a change from each side of the colonists and the Brits. The third is the resulting development.
6 Points: 3.3 SAQs (again, no MCQs as they are not that important when you have read and taken notes in the chapter).  The SAQs are important to show comprehension and you have two of the most prominent historians of the past forty years vying for our attention and analysis, Bernard Bailyn and Gordon Wood. Bailyn died at the age of 97 last year. However, Wood is still strongly kicking and is "only" 88 (oh, and conservatives and libs, and even some lefties like me like Wood; Bailyn was not a favorite as I found him somewhat dull to read over a book, though great in articles).  
8 Points: watch the two 3.2 videos and two of the three 3.3 videos (the last one is not worth it and we can watch together in class on a short sprint through).
8 Points: Summarizes the four videos, and make a note of the procedural/testing aspects as well as the substantive aspects.

Due:

DBQ Quiz for Unit 2 in Google Classroom

DBQ Quiz for Unit 2

For this Unit 2, I am assigning the class a Document Based Question as a quiz, not a test. This is, for some of the class, a first time doing a DBQ.  The AMSCO book has a great explanation of DBQs at pages roman numerals l-lv.  We will discuss those pages today, and strategies to use. I am available tomorrow in support hours to discuss how to respond to a DBQ.  As you may see, though, the quiz is only a total of 14 points, and that is on purpose to make sure we don't panic. :) 


The document based question to answer is at the end of Unit 2 at pages 80-83.  

Due:

Chapter 2.7, Questions and Answers, and AP Central Classroom Video in Google Classroom

Chapter 2.7, Questions and Answers, and AP Central Classroom Video

20 Points: Cornell or Detailed Outline Notes for Chapter 2.7 PLUS page 72 Historical Perspectives (you are not to answer the question at the end/bottom of the page, but to include in your notes the differing perspectives as to how much open government there was in the colonies)
3 Points: 2.7 MCQs
6 Points: 1(a), 1(b), and 1(c) SAQs
2 Points: watch till end the first video at AP Central Classroom for 2.7
2 Points: summary of first video at AP Central Classroom for 2.7
NOTE: You can watch the second video and let me know if you think it is as important as the first. My take was that you had a good sense of the growing disconnect between the colonists and home countries.  But, the cultural issues and other issues raised in the first video help formulate a deeper understanding.

Due:

Chapters 2.4, 2.5, and 2.6 notes and questions in Google Classroom

Chapters 2.4, 2.5, and 2.6 notes and questions

Not due till Wednesday Aug 18 at 11:59 pm


10 Points: Chapter 2.4 Cornell or detailed outline notes
10 Points: Chapter 2.5 Cornell or detailed outline notes
10 Points: Chapter 2.6 Cornell or detailed outline notes
2 Points: Chapter 2.4 MCQs
3 Points: Chapter 2.5 MCQs
2 Points: Chapter 2.6 MCQs
6 Points: Chapter 2.4 SAQs
6 Points: Chapter 2.5 SAQs
6 Points; Chapter 2.6 SAQs
4 Points: AP Central Classroom videos: 2.4 and 2.5 
4 Points: Write a short summary of what was in each video of 2.4 and 2.5 on AP Central Classroom. No points for Chapter 2.6 videos but just watch videos. No need to write anything.

Due:

Chapter 2.3 Cornell or Detailed Outline Notes, and MCQs (3) and SAQs (1(a), (b), and (c)) in Google Classroom

Chapter 2.3 Cornell or Detailed Outline Notes, and MCQs (3) and SAQs (1(a), (b), and (c))

15 Points: Cornell or detailed outline notes for Chapter 2.3
3 Points: MCQs 
6 Points: SAQs

Due:

Cornell Notes etc. Chapter 2.1 and 2.2 plus questions in Google Classroom

Cornell Notes etc. Chapter 2.1 and 2.2 plus questions

10 Points: Cornell notes, etc. for Chapter 2.1
10 Points: Cornell notes, etc. for Chapter 2.2
8 Points: 2 MCQs and 1(a), (b), and (c) short answer questions

Due:

Cornell/Detailed Outline Notes for 1.5 and 1.6; Questions in Google Classroom

Cornell/Detailed Outline Notes for 1.5 and 1.6; Questions

10 Points: 1.5 chapter Cornell/Detailed Outline notes
10 Points: 1.6 chapter Cornell/Detailed Outline notes
18 Points: answer questions at pages 21 and 22 (1.5)
8 Points: answer questions at page 26 (1.6)

Due:

Cornell Notes, etc. for Chapter 1.3 and Chapter 1.4 in Google Classroom

Cornell Notes, etc. for Chapter 1.3 and Chapter 1.4

10 Points: Notes for Chapter 1.3
10 Points: Notes for Chapter 1.4 and take notes on passages at pages 17 and 18, but do not answer questions
9 Points at pages 12-13: 3 points MCQ, and 6 points short answer

Due:

Read and take notes for Chapters 1.1 and 1.2 in AMSCO AP US History Textbook in Google Classroom

Read and take notes for Chapters 1.1 and 1.2 in AMSCO AP US History Textbook

10 Points: Cornell Notes/Detailed Outline Notes style for 1.1.


10 Points: Cornell Notes/Detailed Outline Notes style for 1.2


8 Points: 1 point each for two MCQs and 2 points each for three (a), (b), and (c) short answers.