Course Descriptions

   

 

 Course Descriptions 2022-2023

 

Middle School

 

CORE

 

ENGLISH -- These courses provide instruction and practice in reading a variety of genres, including media literacy, and writing a wide variety of compositions, listening and speaking at higher levels.  *Technology integration – Word Documents

 

 

English / Language Arts 6

This course is designed to provide an introduction to the skills and concepts necessary to read across a variety of genres, write in a wide variety of composition styles, and use listening and speaking skills at the secondary level. Scholars will develop grammar, vocabulary, and reading comprehension skills, as well as learn how to summarize and take notes. Scholars will be introduced to narrative, informational, and argumentative writing, with narrative writing being the primary focus in sixth grade. Scholars will develop a writing portfolio that demonstrates achievement and growth.  Scholars will read both nonfiction and fiction pieces, woven into the World Civilizations content.

 

English / Language Arts 7

This course provides instruction and practice in reading a variety of genres, including media literacy, writing a wide variety of compositions, listening and speaking at higher levels. Scholars complete research projects that require them to understand and evaluate a variety of textual and visual materials. They learn grammar, usage, vocabulary, and other English language skills within the context of reading and writing, and will develop the ability to summarize and take notes. Scholars will continue to work with narrative, informational, and argumentative writing, with informational writing being the primary focus in seventh grade. Scholars will continue to maintain a writing portfolio that demonstrates achievement and growth.  Scholars will read both nonfiction and fiction pieces, woven into the New Mexico History and World Geography content.

 

English / Language Arts 8

This course is designed to further promote the skills and concepts related to reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing, and research. A wide variety of writing techniques and forms will be utilized. Scholars will use complex syntax, paragraphing, apply literary techniques, develop their ability to summarize and paraphrase, as well as use a thesis with support. Scholars will continue to work with narrative, informational, and argumentative writing, with argumentative writing being the primary focus in eighth grade. Scholars will continue to maintain a writing portfolio that demonstrates achievement and growth.  Scholars will read both nonfiction and fiction pieces, woven into the American History content.

 

MATHEMATICS -- Throughout mathematics in 6th,7th, and 8th grade, scholars will build a foundation of basic understandings in number, operation, and quantitative reasoning; patterns, relationships and algebraic thinking; geometry and spatial reasoning; measurement; and probability and statistics. Homework can be expected daily.  *Technology integration – Graphing Calculators

 

The ASK Academy believes in placing scholars in classes appropriate for their knowledge, skill, and developmental level.  Scholars who demonstrate mastery of prerequisite concepts via a placement screening will be accelerated in the math sequence.

 

Mathematics 6

This course develops and reinforces the basic operations. Scholars will explore ratios, proportions, percent, data analysis, probability, measurement, and geometry.  Scholars will also develop number sense, integers, statistics, probability, and pre-algebra skills.  This course emphasizes conceptual applications and problem solving and project based learning.

 

Pre-Algebra 7

This course aligns to grade 7 mathematics, as well as part of the grade 8 Common Core Standards for Mathematics.  It is a faster pace of instruction and learning is compacted to prepare scholars for Grade 8 Algebra 1. The four critical areas are: rational numbers and exponents, proportionality and linear relationships, sampling inference, and geometric figures. The Standards for Mathematical Practice apply throughout this course and, together with the

content standards, present mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes sense of problem situations.                                                                                                   Prerequisite:  Manager Approval

 

Mathematics 8

The course focuses on the number system, expressions and equations, functions, geometry, and statistics and probability.  Instructional time will focus on three critical areas: formulating and reasoning about expressions and equations, including modeling an association in bivariate data with a linear equation, and solving linear equations and systems of linear equations; grasping the concept of a function and using functions to describe quantitative relationships; and analyzing two- and three-dimensional space and figures using distance, angle, similarity, and congruence, and understanding and applying the Pythagorean Theorem.

 

Algebra 1 - 8

This course will study the concepts of Algebra, Data Analysis and Probability. The Algebra concepts studied concentrate on linear relationships. The course emphasizes a 4-dimensional approach of numerical, analytical, graphical, written, and verbal representations to manipulate linear equations. The Data Analysis and Probability section of the course begins with the vocabulary of statistics and experimental design, and then moves into descriptive statistics. There is a heavy emphasis on graphing and understanding the measures of central tendency.  Scholars learn counting principles as they study probability.

Credit Value: .5 high school graduation credit per semester            Prerequisite:  Manager Approval 

 

 

Science -- Scholars will utilize mathematics skills in relation to science curriculum.  Concepts are reinforced through lab activities, demonstrations, and research projects.  Scholars will develop scientific vocabulary and process through investigations utilizing the scientific method to solve problems.  They will develop their scientific skills of observation, comparison, sequencing, hypothesizing, and inferring.  *Technology integration - Excel Spreadsheet

 

Science 6

This course will introduce matter, the three states of matter (solid, liquid, and gas), energy and its forms, and thermal energy.  Scholars will also study the earth’s systems, weather in the atmosphere, minerals and rocks in the geosphere, plate tectonics, and mechanisms that affect earth’s surface systems.  Finally, scholars will learn how all these systems coordinate to create the biosphere.

 

Science 7

This course will introduce cell systems, human body systems, and the role of reproduction and growth in the development of organisms.  The course will investigate ecosystems, populations and the effect of community infrastructure on ecosystems.  Finally, waves and electromagnetic radiation, electric and magnetic forces and their interplay and information technologies will be explored.                                                                                                                                                                          

 

Science 8

This course will include physical science standards. This includes matter, atoms and the periodic table of elements, basic chemistry concepts, energy, waves, electricity and magnetism, and Newtonian physics. In addition, scholars will learn about genes, heredity, natural selection and how organisms change over time.  Finally, the history of the Earth, the role of energy in atmosphere and ocean, climate fluctuations, the Earth-Sun-Moon system, and the interactions of those bodies, our solar system and its place in the universe will be explored.

 

 

Social Studies -- Scholars learn about events, leaders, beliefs and geography in economic and political systems and cultures.  *Technology integration – PowerPoint

 

Social Studies 6

This course studies the ancient civilizations of the world. In particular, scholars will study the Nomadic tribes, the cultures of Mesopotamia, Egypt, India, Greece, and Rome. In addition, the Middle Ages, Reformation and the Renaissance will be studied.

  

Social Studies 7

This course emphasis is on New Mexico history, the influence of our diverse cultures, both past and present.  They will explore the history, geography, culture, government and the economy of the state of New Mexico.

 

Social Studies 8

This course explores U.S. History.  This course will examine historical figures, critical events, values and traditions in our country that have shaped the national identity of the United States.  Major features and purposes of the Constitution will be studied.  Ideas, principles, practices and challenges of American democracy and the responsibility of citizenship will be discussed.

 

 

Fundamental Connections -- Scholars learn how to plan, organize, manage their time and resources.  *Technology integration – Word, Excel, PowerPoint.

 

Fundamental Connections 6, 7 & 8

This course is designed to help scholars develop the backwards planning, time management, organizational, and study skills required for success in high school and beyond.

 

 

ELECTIVE COURSES

 

Sixth Grade Electives

 

Computers and Technology 6

Scholars will have the opportunity to learn and demonstrate an understanding of various applications and resources, which may include Office, Windows XP operating systems, internet use and research, and a wide variety of computer peripherals.  Technology will be used as productivity tools, communication tools, and as problem solving tools.  Scholars will be involved in project oriented research, multimedia presentations and desktop publications.  An emphasis will be placed on employability skills and exploration and integration of technology into current curriculum.

 

Foundations of Biomedical Sciences 6

This course will focus on different body processes on Earth and in outer space. This will allow ample opportunity for tie-ins to the core 7th and 8th grade science curriculum. The course will be divided into 4 sections: Sleep and Daily Rhythms, Muscles and Bones, Heart and Circulation, and The Brain in Space. Each unit is more or less aligned with one progress reporting period, and each focusing on a different aspect of human physiology.

                                                                                                                                                         Gateway to Engineering & Design 6 – to include the following for 9 weeks each

Automation and Robotics (AR) Scholars trace the history, development, and influence of automation and robotics. They learn about mechanical systems, energy transfer, machine automation and computer control systems. Scholars use a robust robotics platform to design, build and program a solution to solve an existing problem.

Design and Modeling (DM) Scholars begin to recognize the value of an engineering notebook to document and capture their ideas. They are introduced to and use the design process to solve problems and understand the influence that creative and innovative design has on our lives. Scholars use industry standard 3D modeling software to create a virtual image of their designs and produce a portfolio to showcase their creative solutions.

 

Seventh Grade Electives

 

Flight and Space 7

In this course, scholars delve into the history of flight and space, discover the science behind aeronautics, and explore traveling and living in space.  Scholars see connections between hands-on projects and academic subjects such as math and science. (A Project Lead the Way course) 

 

Medical Detectives 7

In this course, scholars play the role of real-life medical detectives as they collect and analyze medical data to diagnose disease. They solve medical mysteries through hands-on projects and labs, measure and interpret vital signs, dissect a sheep brain, investigate disease outbreaks, and explore how a breakdown within the human body can lead to dysfunction. (A Project Lead the Way course) 

 

Physical Education 7 (required by state)

All Middle School scholars must take at least one year of physical education.  Scholars will demonstrate competence in fundamental skills and concepts in accordance with New Mexico Physical Education Standards.  The programs will be based on developmental personal skills such as classroom leadership, team collaboration, respect and self-discipline and develop an awareness of key elements for success.  Scholars are expected to participate in physical activity both in and out of school maintaining a healthy level of fitness as their bodies grow and change.  Instruction is directed toward encouraging the incorporation of physical activity into a daily routine and less toward fundamental skill development.  Health Education is incorporated into physical education courses.   All scholars will be required to dress-out for PE.  ASK grade level color T-shirts, black shorts or black sweat bottoms, white socks, sneakers/tennis shoes.

 

Eighth Grade Electives

 

Introduction to Art 

This course introduces students to a variety of tools, materials, skills and techniques through the elements and principals of design.  Students learn to critique their work and the work of others. Year-long class.

 

Automation & Robotics 8

This beginning course in robotics will allow scholars to utilize Lego Mindstorm kits, software, and various Lego Robotics materials. The objective of this course is to introduce the scholar to basic programming as well as problem solving strategies. This course will involve scholars in the development, building and programming of a LEGO Mindstorm robot. Scholars will work hands-on in teams to design, build, program and document their progress. Topics may include motor control, gear ratios, torque, friction, sensors, timing, program loops, decision making, timing sequences, propulsion systems and binary number systems. Scholar designed robots will be programmed to compete in various challenges. Alternating semesters with Foundations of Biomedical Sciences 8

 

 

Health- HS - 8

Course focuses as much on consumer education topics (such as money management and evaluation of consumer information and advertising) as on personal health topics (such as nutrition, stress management, drug/alcohol abuse prevention, disease prevention, and first aid).  In addition, development of decision making, communication, interpersonal and coping skills and strategies are included as course objectives.

Credit Value: .5 credit -- one semester only  

Alternating semesters with Automation & Robotics 8

 

Intervention Options

Reading Intervention, Math Intervention 6, 7, 8

The ASK Academy has created courses to help scholars who have been identified as requiring remediation in the areas of reading, writing, and/or math. These courses will help develop these skills based on the individual scholar’s needs through the use of technology-based resources and individualized instruction.

 

Resource 6, 7, 8

Resource is designed to help scholars develop self-advocacy skills, manage their study and organizational skills with guidance, as well as provide individualized tutoring, mentoring, and academic monitoring.  This course is Tier III intervention available only to scholars who have Individualized Educational Plans.

 

 

 

High School

 

Graduation Requirements – Diploma of Excellence – 28 Total Credits – As follows:

The Classes of 2017 and forward

English (4 credits)

1 cr. English 9

1 cr. English 10

1 cr. English 11

1 cr. English 12

 

Mathematics (4 credits)

1 cr. Algebra 1

1 cr. Algebra 2

2 cr. Other Math

 

Science (4 credits)

2 cr. Lab Sciences – 3 cr. Lab Sciences for competitive schools

2 cr. Elective Sciences

 

Social Studies (3.5 credits)

.5 cr. NM History

1 cr. World History

1 cr. US History

.5 cr. Government

.5 cr. Economics

 

Other (7.5 credits)

1 cr. Physical Education

.5 cr. Health

2 cr. World Language – 3 cr. World Language for competitive schools

4 cr. Biomedical or Engineering Courses

 

Elective Credits (5 credits)

Any of the above courses taken beyond the graduation requirement may count as an elective

Within the above requirements, 1.0 credit must be earned through Honors, Advanced

Placement, Dual Enrollment, or Distance Learning. All Dual Enrollment classes are elective credits.

 

In addition to earning the above credits, scholars must also pass any state required examinations to demonstrate competency in English (reading and writing), mathematics, social studies, and science.

 

Course Enrollment

The ASK Academy requires that all scholars be enrolled in at least one course in each of the four core areas every semester of enrollment. Core areas include English, Math, Science and Social Studies.

 

The ASK Academy also requires that all scholars be enrolled in at least one ASK Academy course within their career pathway (Biomedical Sciences or Engineering & Design) every semester, if possible.  Dual enrollment courses are taken outside the normal school day.  These courses may be used to fulfill a CP requirement with administration approval and if documented in the Next Step Plan.

 

The ASK Academy requires more of its scholars than surrounding districts. In addition to the above requirements, we require 28 credits (credit only granted for a 70% or better). Successful completion at a higher level of rigor better prepares the scholars for post-secondary success.

 

The ASK Academy requires that all scholars be enrolled in a minimum of four (4) classes each semester to maintain their status as an ASK scholar. Given the increased academic requirements of The ASK Academy, it is crucial that parents and scholars communicate regularly regarding academic performance.

 

Credit Recovery

Scholars are eligible for Credit Recovery courses via Edgenuity if they receive an NC in any course required for graduation. Scholars must obtain an Edgenuity Online Program Agreement from the Achievement Coach, complete the form with scholars and parent/guardian signatures and contact information. Scholars are expected to complete the course within the required timeframe (approximately 16 weeks). If scholars do not complete the course within the agreed upon timeframe, an NC will be recorded on the transcript for that semester. Each Edgenuity course bears .5 credit with an additional cost.

 

As scholars applying for credit recovery courses are already behind in credits, they are expected to complete these courses off-site and on their own time, if the School is unable to schedule them into required classes due to scheduling conflicts.

 

 

ENGLISH

 

The ASK Academy requires that all scholars be enrolled in at least one course in each of the four core areas every semester of enrollment. Core areas include English, Math, Science and Social Studies.

 

English 9

Theme: Survey of Literature

This course builds upon the four aspects of language use: reading, writing, speaking, and listening, and up on scholar’s prior knowledge of grammar, vocabulary, word usage, and mechanics of writing.  The various genres of literature are introduced, with writing exercises often linked to reading selections.  Additionally, this course will collaborate with other courses and integrate content from multiple subjects on project-based learning experiences and products.

Credit Value: .5 credit per semester            

 

Honors English 9

This course is designed to give scholars the skills necessary to be successful in the AP Literature and Language courses they take as juniors and seniors.  By building and sharpening these skills in 9th grade, scholars have a greater probability of earning qualifying scores on the examinations that grant college credit.  The objectives of this course are to develop close reading skills of literature and nonfiction texts, analyze the impact of a writer’s stylistic and rhetorical decisions, develop techniques for developing a logical, carefully reasoned argument, and learn how to synthesize several cited sources into a research paper.

Credit Value: .5 credit per semester  

  

English 10

Theme: World Literature

This survey course of world literature explores how themes such as heroism, religion, and political conflict are central to stories defining cultures.  Scholars will explore a variety of short stories, novels, poetry, myths, and religious texts spanning the past two thousand years from countries throughout the world.  This course will provide scholars with the stories that define the cultures they study in World History.

Credit Value: .5 credit per semester  

 

Honors English 10

Pre-AP English 10 is the threshold to the AP Language and Literature Program. To ensure success in junior and senior level courses and examinations for college credit, the 10th grade course reinforces the reasoning and analytical skills foundational to both classes.  The objectives of this course are to explore the roots of Western civilization and examine world cultures in representative literary works, as well as working to develop a mature writing style.  Scholars strengthen their ability to interpret literature during class discussions and small group work.  Scholars are instructed in formal research paper writing and essay forms with an emphasis on vocabulary and grammatical development.   

Credit Value: .5 credit per semester  

 

English 11

Theme: American Literature

This survey course of American literature explores the texts associated with the seminal events in American history.  Scholars will explore a variety of fiction and nonfiction texts from the founding of our country to present day.  Scholars will read short stories, poetry, novels, and primary documents highlighting seminal periods in the development of American culture.

Credit Value: .5 credit per semester            

 

AP English Language & Composition

Theme: College Level Rhetoric and Non-Fiction Texts

AP Language and Composition is an introductory, college-level language arts course.  Through close reading and careful analysis of a broad range of challenging texts, scholars deepen their awareness of rhetoric and how language functions.  Scholars will increase their abilities to identify an author’s purpose, determine the needs of an audience, understand the demands of the subject, and manipulate the mechanics of language:  syntax, diction, imagery, and tone.  Course readings are narrative, exploratory, expository, analytical, personal, and argumentative texts from authors spanning the past two hundred years.  The breadth and depth of resources will create a greater understanding of how language and literature has evolved and affected American culture and thinking.   Advanced Placement scholars prepare to take the Advanced Placement test in English Language & Composition, which may lead to college credit. May count as English 11 or English 12 credit.

Credit Value: .5 credit per semester

 

English 12

Theme: Rhetoric and Non-Fiction Literature

The central focus of English 12 is to develop close reading and careful analysis of nonfiction texts and primary documents, as well as develop college level writing and oral communication skills.  Scholars will increase their abilities to interpret an author's purpose, comprehend expository prose, and manipulate the mechanics of language:  syntax, word choice, and tone.  They will analyze and use rhetorical strategies to create ethos, pathos, in expository and narrative essays, research papers, and analysis of visual art and documentary film.  Scholars will also develop skill in oral persuasion through debate and expository speech. 

Credit Value: .5 credit per semester            

 

AP English Literature & Composition

Theme: College Level World Literature

AP Literature and Composition is an introductory, college-level world literature course.  Scholars will read a variety of imaginative texts spanning the past 500 years.  Through close reading and discussion, scholars will deepen their understanding of the methods writers use to provide both meaning and pleasure to the audience.  As they read, scholars will consider a work’s structure, style, intertextuality, and themes, as well as smaller-scale elements as the use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone.  May count as English 11 or English 12 credit.

Credit Value: .5 credit per semester            

 

MATH

The ASK Academy requires that all scholars be enrolled in at least one course in each of the four core areas every semester of enrollment. Core areas include English, Math, Science and Social Studies.

 

Integrated Math

The fundamental purpose of Mathematics I is to formalize and extend the mathematical concepts and to deepen and extend understanding of linear relationships by contrasting them with exponential phenomena and by applying linear models to data that exhibit a linear trend. Mathematics I uses properties and theorems involving congruent figures to deepen and extend understanding of geometric knowledge from prior grades and ties together the algebraic and geometric ideas studied. The six critical areas include:  (1) relationships between quantities; (2) linear and exponential relationships; (3) reasoning with equations; (4) descriptive statistics; (5) congruence, proof, and constructions; and (6) connecting algebra and geometry through coordinates.  The Standards for Mathematical Practice apply throughout this course and, together with the content standards, prescribe mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes sense of problem situations.

Credit Value: .5 credit per semester

  

Algebra, Data Analysis & Probability -- (Algebra 1)

This course will study the concepts of Algebra, Data Analysis and Probability. The algebra concepts studied concentrate on linear relationships. The course emphasizes a 4-dimensional approach of numerical, analytical, graphical, and verbal representations to manipulate linear equations. The Data Analysis and Probability course begins with the vocabulary of statistics and experimental design, and then moves into descriptive statistics. There is a heavy emphasis on graphing and understanding the measures of central tendency.  Scholars learn counting principles as they study probability.

Credit Value: .5 credit per semester

 

Geometry & Trigonometry

This course will provide knowledge on the topics of deductive and inductive reasoning through construction and measurement. Scholars will develop geometric vocabulary, definitions and theorems in proofs as applied in inter-relations between lines, planes, polygons, circles and polyhedral forms. They will learn the basic concepts involving congruency and similarities between shapes, primarily triangles, quadrilaterals and circles, as well as, the basic data presentation techniques used in statistics. They will be introduced to trigonometric identities, basic right triangle relationships of sine, cosine and tangent. Scholars will be expected to spend time outside of class to complete all work.

Credit Value: .5 credit per semester            

 

Algebra Functions & Graphs -- (Algebra 2)

This course will continue the development of algebraic concepts.  This course is highly recommended for the college-bound scholar, but is also important for a scholar considering a technical training program.  Scholars will continue to explore and develop their algebra skills in the areas of real numbers, imaginary numbers, equations and inequalities, linear, quadratic exponential and logarithmic functions, sequences and series, and some conics as well as graphing analysis.

Credit Value: .5 credit per semester     

Prerequisite: Algebra Data Analysis & Probability, or Algebra I & Geometry & Trigonometry

 

Honors Pre-Calculus

In this course scholars will further their development of advanced algebra, trigonometry, limits, and basic calculus concepts.  The goal is to gain a solid foundation in preparation for introductory calculus classes.  Topics will include advanced work in polynomials, complex analysis, rational, logarithmic and exponential functions, fractions, systems of equations, sequences and series, polar equations, parametric equations, limits, and basic derivatives.  This course is recommended for college-bound scholars.

Technology — A graphing calculator (a TI-84+ or equivalent) is required

Credit Value: .5 credit per semester

Prerequisite: Algebra Functions & Graphs (Algebra 2)

 

Applied Mathematics

The fundamental purpose of this course is to extend the mathematics that scholars learn in mathematics through applications. This course should allow the scholars to apply the concepts learned in mathematics and should not be the first time scholars learn these concepts. The critical areas deepen and extend understanding of linear and exponential relationships through analyzing, solving, and using quadratic functions. The course expands and explores more complex geometric situations and geometric relationships.  Scholars experience mathematics as a coherent, useful, and logical subject that makes use of their ability to make sense of problem situations.

Credit Value: .5 credit per semester

 Prerequisite: Algebra Data Analysis & Probability, or Algebra I & Geometry & Trigonometry

 

AP Calculus A

This course introduces the concepts of calculus, calculating and exploring things that change at variable rates. The major concepts of calculus include limit, derivative, and integrals. We will apply those concepts to various contextual settings. This class will focus on the application of the derivative to understand mathematical relationships and how we analyze variable rates of change. Scholars will explore the notion of limits, the difference-quotient, power rule, product rule, quotient rule, chain rule, exponential and other transcendental function differentiation, and their applications. Integrals will be studied from the perspective of an accumulation function. We will explore each concept in four ways; graphically, numerically, algebraically, and verbally emphasizing the connections and applications.

Technology — A graphing calculator (a TI-84+ or equivalent) is required

Credit Value: .5 credit per semester            

Prerequisite: Honors Pre-Calculus

 

SCIENCE

The ASK Academy requires that all scholars be enrolled in at least one course in each of the four core areas every semester of enrollment. Core areas include English, Math, Science and Social Studies.

 

Integrated Science

This course will examine the mutual relationships between organisms and their environments, as well as address the following topics: organization for matter and energy flow in organisms; cycles of matter and energy transfer in ecosystems; ecosystem dynamics, functioning, and resilience; biodiversity and humans; bio-geology; conservation of natural resources; human impact on earth systems; global climate change; and engineering design.

Credit Value: .5 credit per semester   SciElec

 

Biology

This course is designed to provide information regarding the fundamental concepts of life and life processes. Topics include: the characteristics, classification, and behaviors of living organisms, as well as cell structure and function, plant and animal physiology, genetics, and taxonomy.

Credit Value: .5 credit per semester   SciLab

 

Chemistry

This course examines the chemical and physical behavior of matter. The structure and composition of substances as well as their properties and reactive characteristics (in particular, at the atomic and molecular levels) are concepts discussed in the course. Topics include; the periodic table of the elements, states of matter, atomic structure, and chemical reactions. Scholars will also develop basic laboratory and scientific inquiry skills by collecting, analyzing, and interpreting data.

Credit Value: .5 credit per semester             SciLab

Prerequisite: Algebra, Data Analysis & Probability or Algebra I

 

AP Chemistry

This course will meet the objectives of a college general chemistry course. Scholars will attain a depth of understanding of fundamentals and a reasonable competence in dealing with chemical problems. The course will contribute to the development of the scholars’ abilities to think clearly and to express their ideas, orally and in writing, with clarity and logic. AP Chemistry differs qualitatively from the first chemistry course taught at ASK with respect to using a textbook, the topics covered, the emphasis on chemical calculations and the mathematical formulation of principles, and the kind of laboratory work done by scholars. Quantitative differences appear in the number of topics treated, the time spent on the course by scholars, and the nature and the variety of experiments done in the laboratory.  It is not recommended that scholars take AP Chemistry unless they achieved an 85% or higher in their first chemistry course.

Credit Value: .5 credit per semester             SciLab

Prerequisite: Algebra Functions and Graphs (Algebra 2) &.Chemistry

 

AP Biology

AP Biology is an advanced biology equivalent to an introductory college biology course. Scholars will gain understanding of biological concepts by examining four big ideas established by the College Board: Evolution; Cellular Processes; Genetics and Information Transfer; and Interactions. In addition, the course focuses on inquiry, reasoning, and analysis skills by engaging in established science practices and lab procedures. Scholars will have the option of taking the AP Biology exam in the spring for a fee and if passed may result in college credits. This course is recommended for scholars with a strong science background, especially in biology, and with the commitment to spending time studying including possibly working on a summer assignment.

Credit Value: .5 credit per semester             SciLab

Prerequisite: Biology or Environmental Science

 

Physics A/B

This course is an algebra-based, introductory college-level physics course. Scholars cultivate their understanding of physics through classroom study, in-class activity, and hands-on, inquiry-based laboratory work as they explore concepts like systems, fields, force interactions, change, conservation, and waves.  

Credit Value: .5 credit per semester             SciLab

Prerequisite:  Algebra II or Higher

 

 

Biomedical Sciences Courses and Engineering & Design Courses – some Courses within the Biomedical Sciences and Engineering & Design may count as Science Elective Courses (see those course descriptions)

 

 

SOCIAL STUDIES

The ASK Academy requires that all scholars be enrolled in at least one course in each of the four core areas every semester of enrollment. Core areas include English, Math, Science and Social Studies.

 

New Mexico History

This survey course supports scholars to become more knowledgeable and aware of the historical, cultural, economic, and political history of New Mexico and their geographical connections. Scholars will analyze the role that New Mexico plays in national and international arenas.

Credit Value: .5 credit -- one semester only

 

World History

In this course scholars will develop an understanding for different themes in World History from approximately the year 1300 until the present. These themes are important for scholars to comprehend how the world has been shaped. We will use critical thinking skills to understand and communicate perspectives of individuals, groups and societies from multiple contexts: Continuity and Change, Geography and History, Political and Social Systems, Religions and Value Systems, Diversity, Global Interaction, Impact of the Individual, Art and Literature.

Credit Value: .5 credit per semester  

 

AP Modern World History

In AP World History: Modern, scholars investigate significant events, individuals, developments, and processes from 1200 to the present. Scholars develop and use the same skills, practices, and methods employed by historians: analyzing primary and secondary sources; developing historical arguments; making historical connections; and utilizing reasoning about comparison, causation, and continuity and change over time. The course provides six themes that scholars explore throughout the course in order to make connections among historical developments in different times and places: humans and the environment, cultural developments and interactions, governance, economic systems, social interactions and organization, and technology and innovation.  Scholars are preparing to take the AP exam for Modern World History, which may lead to college credit.

Credit Value:  .5 per semester

 

United States History

This course provides an overview of the history of the United States, examining time periods from discovery or colonialism through the Vietnam War. Political, military, scientific, and social developments are typically included in the historical overview. Course content may or may not include a history of the North American peoples prior to European settlement.  History is not only a study of the past, but also a window into our future.  U.S. History offers themes that tend to repeat itself in every generation.  This class is designed for scholars to learn from our past, as well as to help better understand the challenges the country faces today and into the future.

Credit Value: .5 credit per semester

 

AP United States History

AP U.S. History is designed to be the equivalent of a two-semester introductory college or university U.S. history course. In AP U.S. History scholars investigate significant events, individuals, developments, and processes in nine historical periods from approximately 1491 to the present. Scholars develop and use the same skills, practices, and methods employed by historians: analyzing primary and secondary sources; developing historical arguments; making historical comparisons; and utilizing reasoning about contextualization, causation, and continuity and change over time. The course also provides seven themes that scholars explore throughout the course in order to make connections among historical developments in different times and places: American and national identity; migration and settlement; politics and power; work, exchange, and technology; America in the world; geography and the environment; and culture and society. Scholars are preparing to take the AP exam for US History, which may lead to college credit.

Credit Value: .5 credit per semester            

 

Economics

Course provides for an understanding of basic economic principles and use of economic reasoning skills to analyze the impact of economic systems (including the market economy) on individuals, families, businesses, communities, and governments.

Credit Value: .5 credit -- one semester only 

 

Government

In this course scholars will develop an understanding of the ideals, rights and responsibilities of citizenship and the content and history of the major government documents at the federal and state level and how governments function at the local, state, and national levels.

Credit Value: .5 credit -- one semester only 

 

AP Macroeconomics

The study of AP macroeconomics introduces scholars to economic systems. Emphasis will be placed on the study of national income and price-level determination. Scholars will be introduced to economic performance measures, the financial sector, stabilization policies, economic growth, and international economics. These concepts will be applied to the current economic problems and trends in the United States and our relationship with the world. Scholars are preparing to take the AP exam for Macroeconomics, which may lead to college credit.

Credit Value: .5 credit -- one semester only

 

AP Government & Politics

This class will analyze the origins, progress, trends, and projections of government and politics in the United States and will include both the study of general concepts used to interpret U.S. politics and the analysis of specific examples. Scholars will make an in-depth study of the formation and goals of various political parties, the leaders of those parties, and the effects they have had on American history. This class uses current issues to further understanding. Scholars are preparing to take the AP exam for Government & Politics, which may lead to college credit.

Credit Value: .5 credit -- one semester only

  

Physical Education & Health

(required for graduation)

Health

This course focuses as much on consumer education topics (such as money management and evaluation of consumer information and advertising) as on personal health topics (such as nutrition, stress management, drug/alcohol abuse prevention, disease prevention, and first aid).  In addition, development of decision making, communication, interpersonal and coping skills and strategies are included as course objectives.

Credit Value: .5 credit -- one semester only  

 

Physical Education

This course will develop personal practices that promote lifelong wellness. Scholars will develop skills in human movement, physical activities and physical fitness.  Scholars will also be encouraged to develop habits that promote overall good health.

Credit Value: 1 credit -- one semester only  

 

 

WORLD LANGUAGE

(required for graduation)

 

Spanish I

This course will include basic communication skills in the chosen language, and will introduce geography and culture (music, film, food) of the countries where the language is spoken. Personalized oral and written projects enrich the course. Scholars have opportunities to compare the new language and culture with their own and to observe the use of the language in communities beyond the classroom. Scholars will develop communication skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) for basic situations: greetings and introductions, descriptions of families and friends, and daily conversation.

Credit Value: 1 credit per semester 

 

Spanish II

This course will include individual and group projects to demonstrate cultural understanding and language proficiency. Language and cultural comparisons and community connections continue to be explored. Upon completion of the course, scholars should have the necessary knowledge and skills to enroll in a second semester university language course. Scholars will extend communication skills to other contexts: daily life, school, professions and work practices, and community life. Authentic cultural documents (newspapers, magazines, film, and music) enrich the cultural component of the course.

Credit Value: 1 credit per semester

Prerequisite: Spanish 1

  

BIOMEDICAL SCIENCES

The ASK Academy also requires that all scholars be enrolled in at least one ASK Academy course within their career pathway (Biomedical Sciences or Engineering & Design) every semester of enrollment to fulfill the mission of the Academy.

                                                          

Level 1

 

Principles of Biomedical Sciences (Fall Semester)

The course will provide an overview of all the courses in the Biomedical Sciences program and to lay the scientific foundation necessary for scholar success in the subsequent courses. Scholars will get an overview of health care delivery, patient care, including assessment of vital signs, as well as anatomical terminology and other basics of the human body.  Scholars will investigate the careers pursued in a Biomedical Science Program as they explore the concepts of human medicine and are introduced to research processes and bioinformatics.    

Credit Value: 1 credit -- one semester only

 

Human Body Systems (Spring Semester)

Scholars examine the processes, structures, and interactions of the human body systems to learn how they work together to maintain homeostasis (internal balance) and good health. This course is also intended to help scholars make positive and healthy choices. Scholars will examine health regulations, policies, drug companies, alternative medicine, and disease prevention. Ethical and Social issues related to health will be addressed.  Scholars work through interesting real world cases and often play the role of biomedical professionals to solve medical mysteries. Scholars will also cover the New Mexico Health Education standards.  Second semester may count for elective science credit or health credit.

Credit Value: 1 credit -- one semester only

 

HOSA, Allied Health Occupations

HOSA is a course covers Health Care Occupations and enables scholars to choose one or several specialties to study in more detail.  Course content depends upon the chosen field (such as physical or respiratory therapy, gerontology, medical laboratory technology, medical assisting, and dental assisting, and so on). Full year course.

Credit Value:  0.5 credits per semester

 

Environmental Sustainability

In Environmental Sustainability, scholars investigate and design solutions in response to real-world challenges related to clean and abundant drinking water, food supply issues, and renewable energy. Applying their knowledge through hands-on activities and simulations, scholars research and design potential solutions to these true-to-life challenges. (A Project Lead the Way course).

Credit Value: 1 credit per semester

 

Integrated Science

This phenomena based course addresses ideas and skills scholars build on from middle school science where scholars explain phenomena in the earth and space, life, physical sciences; and engineering, technology, and the applications of science. This course focuses on applicable grade-level multidimensionality of the NM STEM Ready! Science Standards addressing topics of: matter and its interactions; matter and energy; Earth's systems; Earth and human activity; ecosystem - interaction, energy, and dynamics; and engineering design.

Credit Value: 1 credit per semester

 

Level 2

 

Medical Intervention

In this course, scholars follow the life of a fictitious family as they investigate how to prevent, diagnose, and treat disease. Scholars explore how to detect and fight infection; screen and evaluate the code in human DNA; evaluate cancer treatment options; and prevail when the organs of the body begin to fail. Through real-world cases, scholars are exposed to a range of interventions related to immunology, surgery, genetics, pharmacology, medical devices, and diagnostics. This course is sequenced after PLTW Human Body Systems 1661. (A Project Lead the Way course).

Credit Value: 1 credit per semester

Prerequisite: Human Body Systems & Health

 

HOSA, Allied Health Occupations

HOSA is a course covers Health Care Occupations and enables scholars to choose one or several specialties to study in more detail.  Course content depends upon the chosen field (such as physical or respiratory therapy, gerontology, medical laboratory technology, medical assisting, and dental assisting, and so on). Full year course.

Credit Value:  0.5 credits per semester

 

Levels 3 and 4  (alternate years)

 

HOSA, Allied Health Occupations

HOSA is a course covers Health Care Occupations and enables scholars to choose one or several specialties to study in more detail.  Course content depends upon the chosen field (such as physical or respiratory therapy, gerontology, medical laboratory technology, medical assisting, and dental assisting, and so on). Full year course.

Credit Value:  0.5 credits per semester

 

Biomedical Innovation

In the final course of the PLTW Biomedical Science sequence, scholars build on the knowledge and skills gained from previous courses to design innovative solutions for the most pressing health challenges of the 21st century. Scholars address topics ranging from public health and biomedical engineering to clinical medicine and physiology. They have the opportunity to work on an independent design project with a mentor or advisor from a university, medical facility, or research institution's. This course is sequenced after PLTW Medical Interventions 1662. (A Project Lead the Way course).

Credit Value: 1 credit per semester

Prerequisite: Medical Interventions

 

Biomedical Internship

This course does not take place on ASK Campus.  Scholars in this course will find and work as an intern for a business on their own time (a suggested maximum of 10 hours per week).   Curriculum includes projects, research papers, other tasks and a final exam.

Credit Value: .5 credit per semester (Max 2 credits)           

Prerequisite: Grades 11 & 12 -- Apply to the Career Internship Program Manager

 

 

ENGINEERING

 

The ASK Academy also requires that all scholars be enrolled in at least one ASK Academy course within their career pathway (Biomedical Sciences or Engineering & Design) every semester of enrollment to fulfill the mission of the Academy.

 

Level 1

 

Introduction to Engineering Design I & II

This course will teach problem-solving skills using a design development process. Scholars will create models of product solutions which will be analyzed and communicated using solid modeling computer design software. Second semester may count as elective science credit.

Credit Value: 1 credit per semester            

Pre/Co-requisites: Grades 9-12 – Completed or currently enrolled in Algebra I

 

Level 2

 

Principles of Engineering I & II

This course will assist scholars to understand the field of engineering and engineering technology. Scholars will explore various technology systems and manufacturing processes which will help scholars learn how engineers and technicians use math, science and technology in an engineering problem solving process to benefit people. The course also includes concerns about social and political consequences of technological change. Second semester may count as elective science credit.

Credit Value: 1 credit per semester            

Prerequisites: Grades 9-12 – Completed Introduction to Engineering Design I & II

 

Level 3

 

Computer Integrated Manufacturing

Manufactured items are part of everyday life, yet most scholars have not been introduced to the high-tech, innovative nature of modern manufacturing. This course illuminates the opportunities related to understanding manufacturing. At the same time, it teaches scholars about manufacturing processes, product design, robotics, and automation. Scholars can earn a virtual manufacturing badge recognized by the National Manufacturing Badge system. (A Project Lead the Way course).

Credit Value: 1 credit per semester            

Prerequisites: Grades 10-12

 

Level 4

 

Aerospace Engineering, I & II (school years beginning 2019, 2022, 2024)

This course explores the evolution of flight, navigation and control, flight fundamentals, aerospace materials, propulsion, space travel, and orbital mechanics. In addition, this course presents alternative applications for aerospace engineering concepts. Scholars analyze, design, and build aerospace systems. They apply knowledge gained throughout the course in a final presentation about the future of the industry and their professional goals.

Credit Value: 1 credit per semester   Second Semester may count for elective science credit.

Pre/Co-requisites: Grades 11 & 12 – Completed Algebra 1 and completed or currently enrolled in Algebra II.  Complete both Intro to Engineering & Design I/II and Principles of Engineering I/II

 

AP Computer Science Principles 

This course is an introductory college-level computing course that introduces scholars to the breadth of the field of computer science. Scholars learn to design and evaluate solutions and to apply computer science to solve problems through the development of algorithms and programs. They incorporate abstraction into programs and use data to discover new knowledge. Scholars also explain how computing innovations and computing systems—including the internet—work, explore their potential impacts, and contribute to a computing culture that is collaborative and ethical. Year long class.

Credit Value: 0.5 credit per semester

Prerequisite: Grades 11 & 12

 

Digital Electronics I & II  (school years beginning 2018, 2020, 2022)

From smartphones to appliances, digital circuits are all around us. This course provides a foundation for scholars who are interested in electrical engineering, electronics, or circuit design. Scholars study topics such as combinational and sequential logic and are exposed to circuit design tools used in industry, including logic gates, integrated circuits, and programmable logic devices. Second Semester may count for elective science credit.

Credit Value: 1 credit per semester with an added value of .5

Pre/Co-requisites: Pre/Co-requisites: Grades 11 & 12 – Completed Algebra 1 and completed or currently enrolled in Algebra II.  Complete both Intro to Engineering & Design I/II and Principles of Engineering I/II

 

Engineering & Design Internship

This course does not take place on ASK Campus.  Scholars in this course will find and work as an intern for a business on their own time (a suggested maximum of 10 hours per week).   Curriculum includes projects, research papers, other tasks and a final exam.

Credit Value: .5 credit per semester (Max 2 credits)        

Prerequisite: Grades 11 & 12 -- Apply to the Career Internship Program Manager

  

CAREER PATHWAY CLASS

 

Career Pathways 9

Scholars will explore the core questions “Who am I?”, “What do I want?” and “How do I get there?” creating Next Step Transition Plan using guided exploration of interests and learning styles, as well as career exploration and research and evaluating individual academic strengths and weaknesses.

Credit Value: .5 credit per semester 

 

Career Pathways 10

Scholars will further explore the core questions using their Next Step Plans to develop their plans for post-secondary education, career expectations, and life-long pathways to reach their goals.

Credit Value: .5 credit per semester

 

Career Pathways 11

Scholars will further explore the core questions using their Next Step Plans to explore college entrance requirements, including in-depth research into the colleges of their choice to prepare them for admissions to these colleges, taking the necessary college entrance exams, and beginning research into scholarships and financial aid to assist them in paying for their post-secondary education.  If a scholar is not college bound, this class will help them prepare for the world of work by identifying the skills and knowledge required for entry level jobs, reviewing salary and benefit expectations, and identifying career ladders.

Credit Value: .5 credit per semester            

 

Career Pathways 12

Scholars will further explore the core questions to create apply for colleges, preparing for college entrance examinations, and applying for scholarships and financial aid to assist them in paying for their post-secondary education.  If scholars are not college bound, this class will also provide guidance on entering the military or work force by helping them identify the skills and knowledge required for entry level jobs, reviewing salary and benefit expectations, occupational outlooks, and career ladders.

Credit Value: .5 credit per semester 

 

ELECTIVES

 

Driver’s Education

Scholars will receive the knowledge to become safe drivers on America’s roadways.  Legal obligations and responsibilities, rules of the road and traffic procedures, safe driving strategies and practices, and the physical and mental factors affecting the driver’s capability (including alcohol and other drugs) are all included as topics of this course.  Scholars will be preparing to take the state driver’s license exam.

Credit Value: .5 credit -- one semester only 

Prerequisite: Must be 15 years old upon completion of the course

 

Journalism A/B

Scholars enrolled in this course will contribute to the online school news site The Catalyst. Scholars will learn interviewing skills, write news articles and headlines, and take photos and write captions.  Scholars will study creative non-fiction, fiction, and other genres relevant to print media and journalism. Scholars will attend both on and off campus events, and record them through articles, pictures and video for the news site.

Credit Value: 1 credit per semester

 

Manager Aide I & II

Scholars will assist managers with their duties such as organization of materials, grading, photocopying, and working directly with scholars.

Credit Value: .5 credit per semester (Max 2 credits of any Aide courses)

Prerequisite: Grades 11 & 12– Permission of Managers

 

Office Aide I & II

Scholars will work in campus offices, developing skills related to clerical office work.  Duties may include, among others, data entry, filing, record keeping, receiving visitors, answering the telephone, and duplicating.  Scholars may also act as guides for new scholars.  Emphasis is placed on appropriate work attitude, human relations, and proper office procedures.

Credit Value: .5 credit per semester (Max 2 credits of any Aide courses)

Prerequisite: Grades 11 & 12– Permission of Office Managers

 

Resource Room I, II, III, IV

Resource is designed to help scholars develop study and organizational skills, provide individualized tutoring and mentoring, and it will provide academic monitoring.  This course is Tier III intervention available only to scholars who have Individualized Educational Plans.

Credit Value: .5 credit per semester  

 

Scholar Tutor I & II

Scholars will offer tutorial assistance to their peers or to younger scholars.  Scholars will learn to work with other scholars and learn to capitalize on the available resources (staff, written material, internet, etc.) to assist other scholars requesting or needing help.

Credit Value: .5 credit per semester (Max 2 credits of any Aide courses)

Prerequisite: Grades 11 & 12– Permission of Subject Managers                  

 

Senior Seminar (Fall Semester)

Culling through, applying, and selecting a college or university is the first “big” decision scholars make about their future. The objective of Senior Seminar is to help scholars identify colleges that meet their needs (as well as wants), make them aware of matriculation requirements and application deadlines, and prepare for entrance exams. The first quarter will focus on ACT/SAT test preparation and evaluating wants and needs. The second quarter will focus on completing college applications and essays, academic resumes, and preparing for campus interviews and visits. You will also be required to identify and apply to a minimum of ten scholarships. The course will also help scholars develop intrapersonal and interpersonal skills for successful independent living.

Credit Value: .5 credit -- one semester only

 

Yearbook 1 A/B

Scholars enrolled in this course will publish the school yearbook.  They will document the school year, develop the yearbook theme, take all the photos, develop and edit the layout, and work to deadlines.  Scholars will attend both on and off campus events, and record them through pictures for the yearbook.  Year long class

Credit Value: 1 credit per semester

 

Yearbook 2 A/B

Scholars enrolled in this course will publish the school yearbook.  They will document the school year, develop the yearbook theme, take all the photos, develop and edit the layout, and work to deadlines.  Scholars will attend both on and off campus events, and record them through pictures for the yearbook.  Year long class

Credit Value: 1 credit per semester